FRIEDA'S FIRST DAY IN LONDON



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FRIEDA'S FIRST DAY IN LONDON



Mr. Priestley and all the Students.

M r. P r i e s t 1e y: You are getting near the end of your year's work now and I think we want something rather different for our last lesson or two. Now suppose one of two of you give a short talk, or tell a little story or describe an adventure that happened to you; You can choose whatever you like; I want you to talk to the other students for about four or five minutes and then I will tell you what mistakes you made - if there were any - in grammar or construction or pronunciation.

Now who will speak to us at tomorrow's lesson? You will, Frieda? That's very good.

F r i e d a: I don't suppose I shall do it very well, but I could tell you about a little adventure that happened just after I came to England.

H o b: Oh! I can tell you of something that happened to me the first day I came to England.

0 1a f: A funny family named Wiggins lives next door to me. There's Mr. Wiggins, a little fellow who get blamed for everything; there's Mrs. Wiggins who does all the blaming; there's young Timothy Wiggins, and last, but not least, there are Grandma and Grandpa, Mrs. Wiggins' parents. I've writ­ ten a little play about them. Could I read that to you?

M r. P ri e s t 1e y: That sounds splendid. So, at tomorrow's lesson Frieda can tell her adventure, the next day we will have Olaf s play, and then, the day after that, Hob will gave us his story.

* * *

The next day

F r i e d a: I shall never forget, as long as I live, the day when I first set foot in London. I had come from a quiet little town in Switzerland and I had never before lived in a big city, so London was a new world to me and I was dying to find out more about it for myself.

The general opinion abroad is that London has fog or rain, or both every day of the year, but on the day that I arrived it was fine and warm, there was a bright sun and a cloudless sky. The next day was just as beautiful; there was a slight wind that gently moved the leaves on the trees, and you could smell the


spring in the air. "Life is grand", I thought, as I took Anthony, the little boy of the house, for a walk in Kensington Gardens. It was a straight road and I found the way quite easily. When I got my first sight of the gardens the beauty of it all nearly took my breath away. The trees were just bursting into leaf, fresh and green and lovely, and there were beds of spring flow­ ers, red and yellow and blue, in the beautiful, smooth grass under the trees.

People in light spring clothes were walking about, and, to my surprise, they walkers not only along the paths but also across the grass, and no one said a word to them about it. I had never seen such a thing before. We passed a pool in which ducks were swimming, a children's playground with crowds of happy children, a figure of Peter Pan in bronze, more water with boats on it, and everywhere people - people whose lan­ guage I could not understand.

Well, it was time for us to go home; but which way was it? We hurriedly turned down one path that I thought would take us back - and found ourselves in Hyde Park. My mind was quite confused now and I was rather frightened. I ran to the left and to the right and asked several old ladies for the way to Addison Road, but I found to my horror that I could not understand a single word they said in reply. I wandered on till I came to a big open place where I saw men standing on a chair, or a platform, or on the ground speaking or preaching, and people of all kinds were listening or asking questions or making remarks and sometimes laughing at the speaker. Other groups were singing loud and earnestly. Of course, I could not understand a word and was greatly surprised, but now I know this is the famous Hyde Park meeting; there is perhaps nothing else like it in all the world.

Meanwhile, the sun had gone behind a cloud, I was terribly tired and wanted nothing in the world so much as to be at home. At last we got to the park gate at Marble Arch, but this was worse than ever; there were buses, high and fearfully red; motor cars, bicycles, people, and again in an endless line buses everywhere and people climbing in them or hurrying along, while I stood lost in the midst of them.

I was ready to cry, but there was little Anthony who had waited two hours for his tea. In despair I crossed the street on to an island, where I found a policeman. He was a head taller than any other man, and I took my last bit of courage in both


hands1' and said, "Please, sir, where is Addison Road?"2 He began to explain, but when he saw that I couldn't understand he became helpless too. "Are you French?" he said. "No, Swiss", I replied, "but I speak French".

"Wait a moment. I learned French at school, maisj'ai presque tout oublie. Prenez cette route3 allez tout droit, et la onzieme rue a gauche c 'est Addison Road ". The French was bad and the

pronunciation worse, but it was more beautiful to me then than all the words of all the poets. He smiled and then he raised his hand. How wonderful! The traffic stopped; even the red buses stood still and waited until I crossed the road. I soon found myself in streets and roads that I recognised again. Life was grand once more. The sun came out from behind the cloud and London was a beautiful city; but for me, the best thing in it was the blue policeman at Marble Arch.

 

 


Y nP A >K HE HHSI

I. Ilplf,ZQ'MaiiTe npe;:vmlKeHIDI co CJIOBaMu:

1. cloud 5. confused

2. smooth 6. path

3. pool 7. to my surprise

4 horror 8. slight


 

 

9. group

10. despair

11. wonderful

12. earnestly


 

1 To take your courage in both hands. 3To Bh pIDKemre 03HaqaeT: «BecTH ce6J1 KaK MO:lKHO xpa6pee».

2 Ci>pll,lle .rryqrne 6bmo 6hr CKa3aTh: Can you tell me the way to Addison Road, please?

3 Ho H rroqTH Bee 3a6hIJI. Vl)J)i!Te rrpHMO ITO 3TOR i:i:opore, 11 O):(llHHa):(llaTaH yn1111a cneBa 11 6yi:i:eT 3i:i:11coH Poyi:i:.


II. IloeTaBhTe BonpoehIK eJie)zyIOIIJHM npe)VIOlKeHIHIM, Ha'IHHruI HX CJie,!Q'IOIIJHMH CJIOBaMn: How much? How many? Who? When? Did you? Have you? What? Where? Why? Which? What sort?

1. I had come from a quiet little town in Switzerland.

2. There was a bright sun and a cloudless sky.

3. I had never been in a big city before.

4. There was a slight wind that moved the trees.

5. Anthony, the little boy of the house, was with me.

6. The general opinion abroad is that English weather is always bad.

7. As I walked in the park I thought, "Life is grand".

8. The beauty of the gardens nearly took my breath away.

9. There were beds of flowers in the grass under the trees.

10. I had never seen such a thing before.

11. I passed a pool and a children's playground.

12. I ran to the left and to the right.

13. I asked several old ladies the way.

14. Because they couldn't understand my language.

15. There were ten children playing by the pool.

16. It was about five o'clock then.

17. The people were listening and asking questions.

18. Most of the buses were red.

19. Anthony had waited two hours for his tea.

20. The best thing in London was the big policeman.

III. IlOKalKHTe pll3HHIJY (eeJin oua eeTL) B npou3uomeuuu u 3ua11euuu eJie,!Q'IOIIJHX eJIOB B )IByx rpynnax.IlpH)Q'ManTe npe)IJIOlKeuue ua KalK­

)IOe CJIOBO. Bee eJioBa BeTpe11aJiueb B Kuurax I u II.

1. wear, where, were 6. and, hand

2. there, their 7. hour, our

3. air, hair, her 8. know, no, now

4. buy, by 9. its, it's

5. eye, I 10. cloth, clothes

Co11uueuue

1.IlepeeKalKHTe 3TOT paeeKa3 OT TPeTLero JIHI1a.

2. HannmHTe o npuKJI1011euuu, KOTopoe y Bae 6LIJIO.


LESSON 33

OLAF READS HIS PLAY

01a f: Here's my story about the Wiggins family: The Picnic Lunch

Mr. and Mrs. Wiggins are taking their son Timothy and Grandma and Grandpa out in the car for a picnic lunch.

M r s. W ig g i n s: It's half-past twelve, James, and time we found somewhere to eat.

T i m o t h y: Oh, good! I am hungry.

G r a n d m a: I could certainly do with a cup of tea.

M r. W ig g i n s: Well, all keep your eyes open, and we'll see who can find the best place.

M r s. W ig g i n s: James, look! There's a field on the left that will do nicely. Quick, stop the car by the gate.

(The car stops)

T i m o t h y: Oh, look, there are cows in the field.

G ra n d m a: Cows! I'm not going to eat in a field with cows breathing down my neck.

G r a n d p a: I expect there are a few bulls among them. And Nellie's got her red dress on; anything red makes 'em absolutely wild.

M r s. W ig g i n s: Yes, you're right. That cow by the gate has a most unfriendly look on its face. Drive on, James.

(The car moves on)

T i m o t h y: But I'm hungry.

G r a n d m a: It's time I had my cup of tea.

M r. W i g g i n s: Don't worry, there are plenty of good places along the road.

G r a n d p a: We're passing one of them now.

M r s. W ig g i n s: James, stop quickly! Here's a nice stretch of grass.

(The car stops)

G r a n d m a: No, no, this is no good. There's no shade at all. I can't have the sun beating down on me. We must look for a shade place.

M r s. W ig g i n s: All right, drive on, James. We all want Grandma to enjoy her cup of tea.

G ra n d p a: Even if it's bedtime before she has it.

(The car moves on. A quarter of an hour later the car stops again).


M r. W ig g i n s: Well, how does this suit you, Grandma?

There are woods on each side.

G r a n d p a: No fear of getting sunburnt here.

M r s. W ig g i n s: It's far too dark, James. Almost frighten­ ing. We might as well have lunch in our coal cellar. Drive on till we are clear of these trees.

(The car moves on)

G r a n d p a: Now, let's see. We're looking for something with no cows, no sun and no trees. Not too easy.

G r a n d m a: When am I going to get my cup of tea? I wish I hadn't come.

M r s. W i g g in s: Now, don't worry, Grandma. We're com­ ing to the end of the wood now. James, slow down. I can see just the right spot. Over there by the river.

(The car stops)

G r a n d p a: No, Nellie, not there. That ground's damp. You can tell by the greenness of the grass. Being up to the knees in water when I eat my lunch is not my idea of a good picnic.

(The car moves on)

T i m o t h y: But I want my dinner. I'm hungry.

G r a n d p a: You'll have to wait, my boy. Anything damp and my rheumatism comes back.

G r a n d m a: You and your rheumatism! It's nearly half­ past one. One o'clock's the proper time for lunch; and then a nice cup of tea after it.

M r s. W ig g i n s: Now, just sit back and enjoy yourself, Grandma. Look at the nice scenery.

G r a n d p a: A brick wall on one side, and a factory on the other.

T i m o t h y: I want my dinner. I'm hungry.

G ra n d m a: Can't you stop the boy talking, Nellie? He's done nothing but complain ever since we started.

M r s. W ig g i n s: James, James, stop! This field here. The very place we've been looking for.

G r a n d m a: With a lovely big tree to keep the sun off.

G r a n d p a: And it looks dry enough. Any dampness and my rheumatism will be back.

T i m o t h y: At last! At last!

(The car stops)


M r. W ig g i n s: I'll go and unstrap the picnic basket. It's in the back of the car.

G r a n d m a: Now for a cup of tea.

T i m o t h y: I say, look at all these flies coming towards us. G r a n d m a: They're all over the car.

M r s. W ig g i n s: Where have they come from? G r a n d m a: I hope they don't bite.

T i m o t h y: Ow! Ow! They do!

G ra n d m a: Oh, dear! We'll get bitten to death, I wish we weren't going to eat our lunch here.

M r. W i g g i n s (returning /ram the back of the car): Don't worry. We're not!!

M r s. W ig g i n s }

G r a n d m a We're not?

G ra n d p a Not going to eat our lunch here? T i m o t h y

M r. W i g g i n s: No! We've forgotten to bring the picnic basket.

 

* * *

M r. P r i e s t l e y: Well done, Olaf. That was quite a good little play. I think we all want to hear more about the Wiggins family.

0 1a f: I have written another play about them.

M r. P r i e s t 1e y: Good. You can read that to us in the next lesson. Hob, I'm sorry but I'm afraid we must leave your story, too, until then. I'm sure it will be interesting.

H o b: It is!

M r. P r i e s t 1e y: But I want, now, to give you piece of dictation on Olaf s play. Here it is:


,Il;HKTaHT

"Let's have a picnic lunch". This is easy to say and nice to think about. You imagine a beautiful green field with a big tree in the middle which gives some shade from the sun. All around is lovely scenery, and in the distance you can see the cows quietly eating the grass. After a meal of delicious sandwiches, and raw fruit you can imagine lying in the warm sun, and perhaps getting a little sunburnt. Then as darknes comes you stray up your basket and drive happily home.

But it does not always happen like this. You must not forget that flies also like raw fruit, that green fields are sometimes damp fields, that rain may follow the sun, that peaceful cows may be unfriendly bulls, and that even careful men like Mr. Wiggins don't remember everything.

 

KoMMenTapuu

B ypoKe 22 HaM BCTPenurHcb rrpHMepbI pa3roBopHoro aH­ rJIHHCKoro. B ypoKe 33 ecTb eII1e PM rrpHMepoB HJIJIIOCTpH­ PYIOIIIHX oco6eHHOCTH pa3roBopHoit peqH. HarrpHMep:

(1) 0TCYTCTBHe qacTH rrpe,LVIO)Kemrn (rro,LVIe)KaII1ero IDIH CKa3yeMoro). HarrpHMep:

No fear of getting sunburned here ( = There is no fear...). The very place we've been looking for. This field here.

Anything damp (= If Istand or sit on anything damp) and my rheumatism comes back.

Not too easy (= That will not be too easy). Over there by the river.

No, Nellie, not there (= we do not want to stop there). A brick wall on one side, and a factory on the other.

Quick, stop the car (= Be quick and ...).

(2) BocKJim1aTeJibHb1e rrpe,LVIO)Kemrn:

Oh! Good. Cows! I'm not going ... You and your rheumatism! At last! at last!

(3) 3aMeHa CKa3yeMoro rnaronaMH do H be: They do (= They do bite).

We're not (= We're not going to eat our lunch here).

(4) Pa3roBopHbie H,!l;HOMbI:

Icould do with a cup of tea (= Iwant; Ishould like).

A field that will do nicely (= that will suiv our purpose); Now let's see (= let us consider what is required).

A few bulls among 'em.

Anything red makes 'em wild (= makes them wild).


You'll have to wait, my boy.

A nice cup o'tea (use of nice: o' for of).

Look at the nice scenery.

Isay, look at these flies. (Jsay here has practically no mean­ ing; it is just an exclamation that is used to draw attention to something, to express surprise, or just to open a conversation.) BhI TaJOKe 3aMenum, qTo 3TM rrpeMO)J(emrn Kopoqe ,ri:py-

rMX, BCTpeqaBIIIMXC51 B 3TOM KHMre .

• E cp OHET H 4 E CK A SI T PE HHP OB K A


[i:]

lean bean breathe leaf preach

meanwhile

[u] put full look good could

woman


[I]

liguid syringe [u:]

wound fruiterer goose

[e1]

gain famous ache flavour bracelet weigh


[o] socks watch wander horror bronze cough

[u] stone hosier loaf boat grocer brooch


[:J:]

sort raw sore sause salt quart

[au] loud pouch bow powder ounce pound


[A]

duck

drunk stomach tongue thourough onion

[:JI]

joint poison annoy avoid point loyal


[a:]

burst worth earnest circus absurd surgezy

[e] pear dairy care wear hair their


 


Y nP A >K HE HHSI

I. Ilpn;zyMaiITe npe,!VIO:lKCHIDI co CJIOBaMu:

1. field 5. sunburnt

2. neck 6. cellar

3. wild 7. damp

4. worry 8. knees

II. BcTaBLTe npe,!Vloru:


 

 

9. scenery

10. factory

11. strap

12. basket


1. I could certainly do - a cup of tea.

2. There's a field - the left; but there are cows - the field.

3. I expect there are a few bulls - those cows.

4. The cow - the gate has an unfriendly look - its face.

5. There are plenty of good places - this road.

6. I can't have the sun beating down -me; we must look - a shade place.

7. We are looking - somewhere -no cows, no sun and no trees.

8. We are coming - the end - the wood.


9. You can tell it is damp - the greenness - the grass.

10. Look - all these flies coming us.

III. 3aKouquTe pa3,!1,eJIUTe.JibHbi e BonpocuTe.JibHbie npe,zvm1Keum1:

1. It's half-past twelve, - - ?

2. You could do with a cup of tea, - - ?

3. That field will be all right, - - ?

4. You've had a cup of tea, - - ?.

5. You haven't had dinner yet, - - ?

6. You didn't see that bull - -?

7. There's no shade at all here, - - ?

8. We are looking for a place for lunch, - - ?

9. Timothy will have to wait, - - ?

10. The basket is in the back of the car, - - ?

11. James can unstrap the basket, - - ?

12. James didn't unstrap the basket, - - ?

13. Those flies don't bite, - - ?

14. Those flies won't bite, - - ?

15. The flieg didn't bite, - - ?

16. You haven't forgotten the basket, James - - ?

IV. 06'bHCHnTe 3uaqeuue Bbl,!l,eJieuubIX CJIOB u CJIOBocoqeTau uu:

1. "Well, all keep your eyes open".

2. "I could do with a cup of tea".

3. "This field will do nicely".

4. "Drive on utill we are clear of the trees".

5. " Unstrap the basket".

6. "The very place we've been looking for".

7. "The sun beating down on me".

8. "A nice stretch of grass".

V. OnumuTe (ycTHo uJiu nucbMeuuo):

(a) The Picnic Lunch.

JlJJ K oHT P Onb HA SI P A & O T A No. 3

I. IlepeBeroue u3 11,eilcTBHTeJILHoro 3aJiora B cTpa11,aTeJILHL1il 3aJior:

1. Susan closes the window. 2. Lucille drives the car. 3. We are eating cake. 4. The postman will bring the letters. 5. The guard waves the flag. 6. Somebody made this plate in 1760.

7. You must use a dictionary. 8. That dog will bite the post­ man. 9. Shakespeare wrote many plays. 10. Do you understand the questions?

II. (1)HanumuTe yTBep11,meJlbHb1e, BonpocuTeJILHLie u 0Tpu11aTeJlbuue

<l>opMbIrnaroJia to write B npome11,meM npo11,oJ11KeuuoM BpeMeuu.


(2) HanumuTe yrnep)J;HTeJILHHe, BonpocuTeJILHL e u 0Tpu11aTeJILHLie cl>opMbl rnaroJia to drive B 6y)Q'111eM coBepmeuuoM BpeMeuu.

(3) HanumuTe yTBep)J;HTeJib Hhie, BonpocuTeJibHbie u 0Tpu11aTeJibHb1e cl>opMbl rnaroJia to teach B npome)J;meM coBepmeuuoM BpeMeuu.

III. IIepenumuTe cJie.!Q'IOIIIHH OTPL BOK, 3aMeuuB, r)J;e 3TO B03MO:lKHO, po)); CYIIIeCTBHTeJibHb X H MeCTOHMeHHH ua M)')KCKOH, H UOCTaBbTe rJia­ fOJibl B npome)J;mee BpeMB.

A small girl lives with her mother and her aunt. Every day she goes along the road to play with the daughter of the doctor. The two girls play many games. Sometimes they are great ac­ tresses, sometimes famous heroines or great ladies. At other times they cross the fields to the farm and watch the ducks and hens and cows eating their food.

IV. OTBeTLTe ua BonpocL1:

How many:

1. pennies in a shilling?

2. shillings in £1?

3. ounces in a pound?

4. hundredweights in a ton?

5. inches in a foot?

6. feet in a yard?

7. yards in a mile?

8. pints in a quart?

9. What is usually bought by the ton?

10. What is the weight in stones and pounds of someone who weighs 148 lbs.?

V. BcTaBLTe B nponycKH npuBe)J;euuL1e HIDKe CJIOBa:

enjoyed; black; fit; whole; caught; cat; mind; lots; a; home; once; all; company; doubt; fail.

- upon a time there was - dog called Jock. He was - in colour, and there is no - that he was a handsome dog. He kept - by taking - of exercise, and sometimes he was out for the - day trying to catch a rabbit. He never - one, but he didn't -, because there was always a good meal waiting at - . Jock liked - the other animals who lived near, but every day without - he visited his best friend, Sally, Mr. Priestley's -. He was very glad of Sally's -, and Sally - his visits too.

VI. Ha30BHTe no O)J;HOMY npe)J;MeTy, KOTOphie MO:lKHO KYfiHTb B cJie)Q'­ IOIIIHX MeCTax:

1. a diary. 2. a grocer's. 3. a newsagent's. 4. a stationer's.

5. a station booking-office.


f)J,e MOJKHO KYJIHTh:

6. a bottle of medicine. 7. a packet of cigarettes. 8. a loaf of bread. 9. a ring. 10. a cabbage?

VII. 3aKoHqnTe pa3,l1,e.JIHTeJibHbi e Borrpocb1:

1. You won't drop it, - - ?

2. There are no bulls here, - - ?

3. It's time for dinner, - - ?

4. You can do this, - - ?

5. The flies didn't bite, - -?

6. Hob has done his work, - - ?

7. Jock didn't visit Sally, - - ?

8. Grandpa was a grocer, - -?

9. We are working hard, - - ?

10. This is nearly the end, - - ?

VIII. IIocTaBLTe B HaCTOBeM BpeMeHn:

1. Jan often looked at Frieda.

2. Mr. Wiggins bought a new car.

3. He wrote a letter, but forgot to put the stamp on.

4. The grocer weighed the butter, and I watched him.

5. The teacher came in and saw that the boys were working hard.

IIocTaBhTe B 6y.zzym:eM speMeuu:

6. He went to London in April.

7. Mr. Wiggins carries the picnic basket.

8. Lucille drove the car.

9. The cat tried to catch a mouse.

10. The mouse ran away.

IX. IIplf,ZQ'MaiiTe rrpeAJioxeHnB co cJie,!Q'IOMn CJIOBaMn u CJIOBoco­ qeTaHHBMn:

1. proud. 2. pardon. 3. recognise. 4. bunch. 5. market.

6. abroad. 7. all the time. 8. looking forward. 9. nothing in between. 10. fault. 11. landlady. 12. beside. 13. job. 14. strict.

15. much better. 16. all over the place. 17. scenery. 18. for a change. 19. pain. 20. patient (noun).

X. YKa1K0Te, K KaKoii qacTn pequ rrpnHaMe:>KaT Bbl,ll,eJieHHbie CJIOBa:

1. We went for a ride.

2. I can ride a horse.

3. That car costs four hundred pounds.

4. I talk too much.

5. Hob gave an interesting talk.

6. Susan burned the toast.


7. The driver had a bad burn on his arm.

8. I had many presents for my birthday.

9. The present year is 1955.

10. Hob likes to wear a paper hat.

11. I am writing on paper.

12. These are good paint brushes.

13. He painted very well.

14. Jock will jump through the window.

15. This is a through train to Brighton.

XI. IIocTa.BhTe npeAJIOJKeHIDI u3 ynpIDKHeHIDI X B OTpuTem.uyro <l>OPMY·

XII. IIocMOTJIHTe Ha KapmHKY u OTBeTbTe Ha Bonpocbl:

I

(1) (2) (3)

 

A Black Eye1or Two

1. What people do you see in picture No.1?

2. Whot relation do you think the man is to the boy?

3. Who has got a black eye? How do you think he got it?

4. What do you think he is saying to his father?

5. Why is he pointing with his finger?

6. Do you think it was a small boy or a big boy who had given him the black eye? (Picture No.3 may help you to give the answer.)

7. In picture No.2, the father looks angry. Where do you think he is going? What for?

8. He's come back now. What is he doing?

9. Who has a black eye now?

10. What do you think has happened?

IIepecKaJKHTe paccKa3 "A Black Eye or Two".

 

1 black eye - CHIDIK.


ENGLISH-RUSSIAN DICTIONARY


A

able ['e1bl] CIIOC06Hblll abroad [a'br;,:d) 3a rpamrn:eft

absent ['rebsant] OTcyrcrnyroll(Illi absent-minded ['rebsant-mamd1d]

pacceIDIHhiil

absolutely ['rebsalu:th] a6coJIIOTHO absurd [ab's3:d] a6cyp)Ulbrft accident ['reks1dant] cnyqaft according [a'b:d11J] comacHo account (n.) [a'kaunt] cqeT

ache [e1k] 6oneTh across [a'kros] qepe3 actor ['rekta] arcrep

actress ['rekt1s] arcrpH:ca addilion [a'd1fn] ,n:o6aBJieHH:e

adventure [ad'ventj"a] rrpH:KJIIOqeHH:e aerodrome ['earadraum] a3po,n:poM afraid [a'fre1d] 60HThCH

afterwards ['a:ftawa<l3] IIOJ:lKe against [a'genst] rrponrn agent ['e1<l3ant] areHT

allow [a'lau] pa3peIIJaTh along [a'lo!)] B!J:OJib

alter [';,:!ta] mMeHHTh

alteration [;,:lta're1f n] H:3MeHemre amount [a'maunt] KOJIH:qecrno anxiety [rel)'za1at1] 6ecrroKoftcrno anxious ['rel)(k)f as] 6ecrroKoilHhlli apologise [a'pola<l3a1z] mBH:HHThCH appetite ['rep1tait] arrrreTH:T

apply [a'pla1] rrpH:MeHHTb appointment [a'pomtmant] Bcrpeqa apricot ['e1pnkot] a6pH:Koc arithmetic [a'n8mat1k] apmpMeTH:Ka armchair ['a:m'tj"ea] Kpecno

army ['a:m1] apMH:H around [a'raund] BOKpyr

arrange [a'rem<l3] ycTpaH:BaTb arrest [a'rest] apecTOBhlBaTh ashes ['ref1z] rrerreJI astonishment [as'tomfmant]

y,n:H:BJieHH:e

attention [a'tenfn] BIDIMaHH:e audience [';,:d1ans] ay,n:mopH:H aunt [a:nt] TeTYIIIKa

awake [a'we1k] rrpocblrraTCH

B

backwards ['brekwa<l3] HaJa,n: bad-tempered ['bred'ternpad] pa3,n:palKH:TeJibHbIM

bag [breg] CYMKa bake [be1k] rre%


balloon [ba'lu:n] B03,n:yIIIHbIM map bank [brel)k] 6aHK

barn [ba:n] aM6ap

basket ['ba:sk1t] KOp3H:Ha bathroom ['ba:eru(:)m] BaHHaH

battleship ['bretlf1plJIH:HKOP

bay [be1] 6yxra beach [bi:tf] IIJIIDK bean [ bi:n] 606 beard [b1ad] 6opo,n:a beat [bi:t] 6H:Tb

become [b1'kAm] CTaHOBH:TbCH bedroom ('bedru(:)m] CIIaJihHH beer [b1a] IIH:BO

beg [beg] rrpocH:Tb

behave [bi'he1v] BeCTH: ce6H behaviour [bi'he1vja] rroBe,n:eHH:e bell [be!] 3BOHOK

belong [b1'lo1J] rrpH:Ha,n:Jie)KaTh belt [beltlIIOHC

beside (bi'said] PMOM

besides [bi'sa1<l3] KpoMe Toro beyond [b1'jond] 3a

biscuit ['b1sk1t] rreqeHhe bit (n.) [b1tj KYCOK

bite [bait] KYCaTh blame [ble1m] BH:HH:Th

blanket ['blre1Jk1t] o,n:eHJio blaze [ble1z] IIJiaMH

blind [blamd] cnerroft blouse [blauz] 6ny3a blow [blau] y,n:ap

blunt [b!Ant] zyrroft blush [b!Af] KpacHeTb

boarding-school ['b;,:d11Jsku:l]

IIIKOJia-H:HTepHaT

boat [baut] Kopa6Jlb bone [baun] KOCTh

book (v.) [buk] 3aKa3bIBaTb bookcase ['bukke1s) KHH:)J(HblM

IIIKa<l>

booking-office ['buk11J of1s] 6H:JieTHaH Kacca

bookstall ['bukst;,:l] KHH:)J(HhIM KH:OCK

borrow ['borau] 3aHH:MaTb bottle ['botl] 6yrbIJIKa bowl [baul] MH:CKa

box-office ['boks of1s] TearpaJibHaH Kacca

bracelet [bre1sht] 6pacneT braces ['breISiz] rro,n:TH)KKH: brains [bremz] M03rH:


brandy [brrendr] 6peH.D:H brass [bra:s] JiaT)'Hh break [brerk] JIOMaTb breath [bree] )J,bDraHHe breathe [bri:i!] ,!l;hIIIIaTh brick [brrk] IGlpIIWI bridge [brr<l3] MOCT bronze [bronz] 6poH3a brooch [brnuf] 6pOIIIh build [brld] CTpOHTb

bull [bul] 6bIK

bun [bAn] 6ynoqKa bunch [bAn(t)J] 6YKeT bundle [bAndl] CBH3Ka burst [b3:st] B3pbIBaTbCH bury ['berr] xopOHHTh

business ['brzms] 6mHec butcher ['buf;i] MHCHHK

c

cafe ['krefr] Ka<l>e

calf [ka:f] reJieHoK call [b:l] 3BaTb

calm [ka:ml CIIOKOHHb!H

can [kren] 6aHKa candle ['krendl] CBeqa cap [krep] KerrKa

card [ka:d] KapTa cargo ['ka:g;iu] rpy3 carol ['krer(;i)l] rrecHH carpet ['ka:prt] KOBep

carriage ['krerr<l3] KapeTa carve [ka:v] Bhrpe3aTb case [kers] HIIJ,HK

catch [kref] JIOBHTh cattle ['kretl] CKOT ceiling ['si:lrIJ] IIOTOJIOK cellar ['sel;i] IIO,!l;BaJI cent [sent] n:eHT

ceremony ['serrm;im] n:epeMOHHH

chain [fem] n:em chance [fa:ns] cnyqail: charge [fa:<l3] rmaTa charming ['f a:mrl)]

oqapoBaTeJihHhrn

chat [fret] pa3roBop cheerful ['fr;iful] Becenh!il: cliemisi ['kemrst] ameKaph cheque [[fek] qeK

chest [fest] rpy,!l;h chief [fi:f] IIIe<l>

chips [frps] xpycrnIIJ,Hil: Kaprn<l>enh chop n [fop] py6HTb

church [f3:f] n:epKOBh circle ['s3:kl] rcpyr

circular ['s3:kjufa] KpyrJihiii city ['srtr] ropo,!1;


clergyman ['kb:<l3rm;in] cmnn:eHHHK

clerk [kla:k] KJiepK cliff [khf] YTec

clockwork ['klokw3:k] qacoBoil:

MexaHH3M

close (adj.) ['kfaus] 3arcpbIThIH club [klAb] KJiy6

coal ['k;iul] yroJih coast ['k;iust] 6eper coat ['k;iut] IIaJibTO cocoa ['k;iuk;iu] KaKao coin [bm] MOHeTa coke [buk] KOKC

collar ['kol;i] BOPOTHHK

collar-stud ['kofastAd] 3aIIOHKa collect [k;i'lekt] co6ttpaTb collection [b'lekfn] KOJIJieKn:HH college ['kolr<l3] KOJIJie)J;)K

comb [bum] pacqecKa company ['kAmp;im] KOMIIaHHH compare [bm'pe;i] cpaBHHBaTb compartment [bm'pa:tm;int]

OT,!l;eJieHHe

complain [bm'plem] 2Kll!IOBaTbCH complete (v.) [k;im'pli:t]

3aKattqHBaTh

composer [bm'p;iuz;i] KOMII03HTOP concert ['kons;it] KoHn:epT confectioner [brr'fekf ;in;i] KOH.D:HTep

confused [bn'fju:zd] 3aIIYTaHHhIB congregation [kol)grr'gerfn]

KOHrperan:HH considerably (brr'srd;irnbh]

3HaqHTeJibHO

consulting-room [k;in'sAltrIJru(:)m]

Ka6HHeT Bpaqa continental [kontr'nentl]

KOHTHHeHTaJibHb!H

continue [bn'tmju:] rrpo,!l;OJDKaTh copper ['kop;i] Me,!l;b

copy ['kopr] KOIIHH

cornflakes ['b:nflerks] KYKYPY3Hhre XJIOIIbH

costume ['kostju:m] )KeHcKHil: KOCTIOM

cottage ['kotr<l3] KOTTe)J;)K cotton ['kotn] xnorroK cough [kof] KaIIIJIHTh counter ['kaunt;i] rrpHJiaBoK

county ['kauntr] rpa<l>crno, orcpyr courage ['kArr<l3] xpa6pocTb

court [b:t],I1;Bop cousin ['kAzn] KY3eH

cover ['kAv;i] rroKpbIBaTb coward ['kau;id] TPYC


cowardice ['kau;id1s] rpycoCTh crease [kri:s] CKJia;:u<a

crew [kru:] 3KIHiaJK crop [krop] ypo)J(llii crowd [kraud] Tomm cure [kju;i] neqHTh

curious ['kju;in;is] mo6orrhITHhIB curtain ['b:tn] 3aHaBec

custom ['kAst;im] o6hlqaii customer ['kAst;im;i] IIOKYIIaTeJib customs ['kAst;imz] TaM02KID! cutiery ['kAtl;in] HO:lKH, BHJIKH,

JI02KKI'!

D

dairy ['de;inlMOJIOqHblH Mara3HH

damage ['drem1cf:3] yinep6 damp [dremp] cb1poii

danger ['demcf:3;i] orracHOCTh

dare [de;i] cMeTb deaf[det] r.rryxoii

deal [di:!] cornarneHHe death [dee] cMepTh decide [di'said] pemaTu

decorate ['debre1t] YKPaIIIaTh deer [d1;i] oneHh

dentist ['dentist] )l;aHTHCT department [di'pa:tm;int] OT)l;eJI despair (d1s'pe;i] oaHHHe detective [di'tekt1v] ,Tl;eTeKTHB detennination [d1,t3:mm'e1fn]

peIIIHMOCTb

detennine (di't3:mm] orrpe,Tl;eJIJITh diamond ['dai;im;ind] 6pHJIJIHaHT dictionary ['d1kf;inn] cnoBapb

die [da1] YMJiPaTb

dining-car ['damn) ka:] BaroH- pecTopaH

direct [di'rekt] rrpHMoii

direction [di'rekf;in] HarrpaBJieHHe dish [d1fl 6JIIO)l;O

disobedient [dm'bi:dj;int]

HeIIOCJIYIIIHbIH

disobey [d1s;i 'be1] He CJIYIIIaTbCH distinction [dis't11Jkfn] paJJI}iq}ie district ['d1stnkt] paiioH

divide [di'va1d] ,Tl;eJIHTh doer (du;i] TOT, KTO )l;enaeT doll [do!] KYKJia

dollar ['dol;i] )l;OJIJ1ap doubt [daut] coMHeHHe

downstairs ['daun'ste;iz] BHH3 no JieCTHHI:(e

dozen ['dAZn] )l;IO:lKHHa drake [dre1k) cene3eHh drawer [dr:i:] HllIHK cTona

dressing-gown ['dres11)gaun] xanaT


drill [dnllCBepJIHTb drop [drop] KaIIJIJI

drunk [drAl)klIlbHHbIH

duck [dAk] YTKa

during ['dju;inIJ] B TeqeHHe duty ['dju:t1] )l;OJir

dying ['danIJ] YMJiPaHHe

E

earn [3:n] 3apa6aThIBaTh east [i:stlBOCTOK

Easter ['i:st;i] rracxa effort ['efat] ycHJ1He

eiderdown ['a1d;idaun] rryxoBoe O)l;eHJIO

electric [i'lektnk] 3JieKrpJiqecKHii elephant ['ehfant] cnoH

emerald ['em;irnld] HJYMPY)l; empire ['empa1;i] HMrrepHH empty ['empt1] rrycTOii enemy ['en;im1] Bpar

engine ['encf:3m] )l;BHraTeJih engineer [encf:3i' m;i] HIDKeHep enormous [i'n:i:m;is] orpoMHhlii envelope ['enVIl;iup] KOHBepT equal ['i:kw;il] paBHhIH equipment ['1kw1pm;int]

o6opy,Tl;oBaHHe

esquire [1s'kwai;i] 3CKBaiip essay ['ese1] 3cce

everlasting [ev;i'la:stIIJ] BeqttbJH evidence ['ev1d;ins] YJIHKH examination [1gzremi'ne1fn] 3K3aMeH excellent ['eks;ifant] rrpeBocxo)l;Hhlii excited [1k'sa1t1d] B036)')!(,!IeHhiii excuse (v.) [1ks'kju:z] H3BHHHTh existence [19'z1st;ins] cyinecTBoBaHHe explanation [ekspl;i'ne1f;in]

o6'bHCHeHHe

express [1ks'pres] BhlpaJKaTb expression [1ks'prefn] BhlpaJKeHHe

F

fact [frekt] <PaKT

factory ['frekt;in] <Pa6pHKa fade [fe1d] YBMaTb

fail [fed] He y)l;aBaThCH failure ['fedj;i] Hey)l;aqa fairy ['fe;in] <PeH

faithfully ['fe18fuh] BepHO, qecTHO false [fo:lslcPaJibIIIHBbIH

fainiliar [fa'mdj;i] 3HaKOMbIH famous ['fe1m;is] H3BeCTHhIH farewell ['fe;i'wel] rrporu:aHHe farthing ['fa:OIIJ] <PapTHHr fashion [frefn] <PacoH

fasten ['fa:sn] 3acTernBaTb fault [fo:ltlOIIIH6Ka


favourite ['fervant] mo6HMhrn fear [fra] crpax

fearfully ['frafulr] 6oJl3mrno fiddle ['frdllCKpHIIXa

fill [fr!] HaIIOJIHHTb

finally ['famalr] ttaKotte11 fireplace ['faraplers) KaMHH firm (adj.) [fa:m] rnep.[(bIM firm (n) [fa:m] qmpMa fisherman ['frJaman] pb16aK

fishmonger ['frJmAI)ga] ToproBe11 pb16oli

fit [frt] COOTBeTCTBOBaTb flag [flreg] qmar

flame [flerm] IIJiaMH flannel ['flrenl] qmatteJib

flat (adj.) [flretlIIJIOCKHM

flat (n.) [flret] KBapT1'!pa flavour ['flerva] rrpHBKYC fleet [fli:t] QJJIOT

flesh [fief] IIJIOTh flock [fink] cm.n:o floor [fb:] rron fool [fu:l] .n:ypaK

foolish ['fu:lrJ] rnymrli fork [f:J:k] BHJIKa

freedom ['fri:dam] cBo6o.n:a freeze [fri:z] 3aMopa)JarnaTh frequently ['fri:kwantlr] qacTO fried [frard] )J(llpettblli

frightened ['frartnd] HcrryraHHbIM frock [frok] IIJiaTbe

frosty ['fmstr] Mopo3Hh!M fruiterer ['fru:tara] ToprOBel.I

QJPYKTaMH

furnish ['fa:mJ] ctta6)J<aTb furniture ['fa:m1Ja] Me6eJib

G

gain [gem] IIOJIY'laTb gallon ['greln] raJU!OH game [germ] mpa gander ['grenda] rycaK

gas [gres] ra3

gather ['grella] co6ttpaTb

gentleman ['ciJentlman] )l;)KeHTJihMeH ghost ['gaust] rrpHBH.n:eHHe

glass [gla:s] CTeKJio glasses ['gla:srz] O'IKH

glorious ['gb:nas] cnaBHhrM glory ['gb:n] cmma

gloves [glAvz] rrepqaTKH golf [golf] roJihQJ

goods [gudz] ToBap goose [gu:s] rych

government ['gAvanmant] rrpaBHTeJibCTBO


grammar ['grrema] rpaMMaTHKa gramophone ['grremafaun]

rrpoHrpbrnaTeJib

grand [grrend] BeJIH'lecrneHHhlM grandfather ['grren(d)fa:lla] .n:e.[(ylllKa grandmother ['grren(d)mAlla]

6a6yrIIKa

grapes [grerps] BHHorpa.n: greet [gri:t] rrpHBeTCTBOBaTb grind ['gramd] MOJIOTb

grocer ['grausa] 6aKaJieMIIIHK groceries ['grausanz] rrpo.[(YKTbl group [gru:p] rpyrrrra

grow ['grau] pacTH guest [gest] rocTb guide [ gard] TH.[(

gum [gAID] :iK:eBaTeJibHfil! pe3HHKa gun [gAn] p)')Kbe

H

half-crown ['haf'kraun] rroJIKPOHbI halfpenny ['herpam] rroJII1eHHH hall [h:i:l] XOJIJI

ham [hrem] BeT'IHHa

handkerchief ['hreIJka1Ji:f] ttocoBoM IIJiaTOK

handle ['hrendl] pyqKa, PYKOHTKa hang [hreIJ] BHCeTb

hat [hret] IIIJillrra

headache ['hederk] roJIOBHfil! 6oJib headmaster ('hed' ma:sta] .ri:ttpeKTop

IIIKOJibl

health [hel8] 3.[(opoBbe heat [hi:t] TeIIJio

heel [hi:l] IDITKa height [hart] BhlCOTa herd [h3:d] CTa.[(O hero ['hrarau] repoli

heroine ['her:im] repomrn herring ['henIJ] ceJib.[(b hers [h3:z] ee

herself [h3:'self] ce6Jc himself [hrm'self] CaM

historical [hrs'tonkl] HCTOpH'leCKHM hollow ['holau] rronhrM

holly ['holr] OC1'pOJIHCT honey ['hAnr] Me.n: honour ['ona] qecTh horror ['hora] Y:iK:aC

hospital ['hosprtl] 60JihHHI.1a hostess ['haustrs] X03JIMKa however [hau'eva] O.[(HaKo hundredweight ['hAndradwert]

aHTJIHMCKHM 11eHTHep (50,8 KT)

hung [hAIJ] rrpoIII. Bp. OT hang

hunt [hAnt] OXOTHTbCJI hurry ['hAn] crreIIIHTh


I

illustrate ['Ii;istre1t] IDIJIIOClpMpoBan. imaginary [i'mrecl3m;in]

B006pIDKaeMhill

imagine [i'mrecl3rn] Boo6pa)KaTh important [1m'p:i:tant] BffiKHhIH impossible [1m'pos1bl]

HeB03MO)KllhIB

impression [1m'prefn] Brre'laTJieHMe indeed [rn'di:d] B caMOM .r1ene information [rnfa'me1Jn]

MH<l>OpMaI..(IDI

injection [m'cl3ekJn] MHDeKI.IIDI insect ['rnsekt] HaceKoMoe inside ['m'smd] BHYfPM instance ['mst;ins] rrpMMep instrument ['rnstrument]

MHClp)'MeHT

insurance [m'Ju;irnns] ClpaJmBaHMe insure [rn'Ju;i] ClpaJmBaTh

intend [rn'tend] HaMepeBaThCH intention [rn'tenJn) HaMepeHMe introduce [mtr;i' dju:s] 3HaKOMMTh iron ['a1;in] 2KeJie3o

itself [1t'self] caM, caMa, caMo

J

jacket ['cl3rek1t] rrll.[(2KaK

jam [cl3rem] BapeHhe jeweller ['cl3u:;il;i] IOBeJIMP

jewellery ['cl3u:;iln] .r1Parou;eHHOCTM job [cl3ob] pa6oTa

join [cl3:im] rrpMcoe.[(MHHTh joint [cl3:imt] cycTaB

journey ['cl33:m] rryTernecTBMe

jug [ci3Ag] KYBIIIMH

jump [cl3Amp] rrph1ran. jumper ['cl3Amp;i] ).OKeMrrep

K

keep [ki:p] .r1ep2KaTh

kept [kept] rrporn. Bp OT keep

kettle ['ketl] '!aHHMK key [ki:] KJIIO'I

kill [krlj y6MBaTh

kipper ['k1p;il KOIT'!eHaH CeJlh,!.\b

knee [ni:] KOJieHo knife [na1f] H02K knight [na1t] ph1u;aph knock [nok] cTYK

L

label ['le1bl] HpJihIK

lamb [!remlHIHeHOK lamp [lremp] JiaMITa

lamp-shade [lremp Je1d] a6 land [!rend] 3eMJIH

landlady ['lrendle1d1]

,!.(OMOBJia,I.(eJIMu;a


lavatory ['lrev;itn] zyaneT lawn [b:n] ra30H

lay [lei] KJiaCTh leaf [li:f] JIMCT

lean ['li:n] TOiu;MH

lend [lend] O)..(aJI2KMBaTh lift [liftj JIM<l>T

linen ['!men] 6eJlhe lion ['la1;in] neB

lipstick ['hpst1k] ry6HaH rroMa,n;a liquid ['hkwidj 2Kll,!.(KOCTh

list [listlCITMCOK

load (v.) [l;iud] rpy3MTh loaf [l;iuf] 6yxaHKa

loan [l;iun] 3aeM

lose [lu:s] TepHTh

lost [lost] rrporn. Bp. OT lose

loud [laud] rpoMKMH loyal ['b1;i]j JIOHJihHhlll luck [IAk] y)..(a'!a luggage ['IAg1cl3] 6ara)K

M

magazine [mreg;i'zi:n] 2KYPHaJI maid [me1d] CJIY2KaHKa

mail [mer!] ITO'!Ta manner ['mren;i] MaHepa

march (v.) [ma:1fl MaprnMpoBaTh mare [me;i] K06hIJla

mark [ma:k] MeTKa market ['ma:k1t] phIHOK marry ['mren] 2KeHMThCH

mat [mretlKOBPMK

match (n.) [mre1fl MaT'! measurement ['me3;im;int] Mepa

(measure)

measure ['me3;i] Mepa (measurement)

meat [mi:t] MHCO

medicine ['medsm] neKapcTBo member ['memb;i] '!JleH mention ['menfn] yrroMMHaTh mess [mes] 6ecrropMOK

metric ['metnk] Melpll'!eCKMH mice [ma1s] MH. 'I. OT mouse midst [midst] cpe)..(M

mill [mrl] MeJlhHMu;a mince [mms] <l>aprn

mine [mamlMOH, MOH, MOe

mirror ['m1rn] 3epKano

miserable ['m1zrnbl] HecqacTHhIH mistletoe ['m1slt;iu] oMeJia 6eJiaH mix [m1ks] cMeIIIMBaTh

mixture ['m1kstj';i] cMech moment ['m;ium;int] MOMeHT mouse [maus] MhIIIIh


multipication [mAlt1plr'ke1fn]

YMH02Kemi:e

multiply ['mAlt1pla1] YMH02KaTh mummy ['mAm1] MaMa murmur ['m3:ma] 6opMoTami:e myself [mai' self] caM, caMa

N

nasty ['na:st1] rrpOTHBHbIH

nation ['ne1fn] HfillIDI

naturally ['metfr(a)lr] ecTecrneHHO neck [nek] rneH

necklace ['neklrs] o2Kepenhe negro ['ni:grau] tterp (Negro) nephew ['nevju:] IIJieMHHHHK nevertheless ['nevalfa'les] TeM He

Mettee

new-laid ['nju:le1d]

TOJibKO qTO CHeCeHHOe (HHI\O)

newsagent ['nju:zeutant] rrpo.ll:aBeu; ra3eT

niece [ni:s] IIJieMHHHHI\a nonsence ['nonsans] B3.ll:OP normal ['n:i:ml] HOPMaJibHhIH north [n:i:e] ceBep

nowadays ['nauade1z] B HaIIIH ,n:HH nut [nAt] opex

nylon ['nailon] HefiJioH

obedience [a'bi:djans] rroCJiyrnaHHe

obedient [a'bi:djant] IIOCJIYIIIHhIH obey [a'be1] IIOBHHOBaTbCH occasion [a'ke13n] cnyqafi

office ['ofrs] KOHTopa

oil-painting [':id'pernt1IJ] KapTHHa,

HaIIHCaHHaH MaCJIOM

omelette ['omlrt] oMJieT oneself [wAn'self] caM, caMa onion ['Anjan] JIYKOBHI\a

operation ['opa're1fn] orrepau;IDI

opinion [a'prnjan] MHeHHe optimist ['opt1m1st] OIITHMHCT orange ['orrn<t] arreJihCHH order (v.) [':i:da] rrpHKa3hIBaTh

origin ['on<trn] rrpoHCXO)K)J;eHHe otherwise ['Ai!awaiz] HHaqe ounce [auns] YHI\IDI

ours [auaz] Harn

ourselves [aua'selvz] caMH owing ['aUIIJ] H3-3a

OX [oks] BOJI

oxen ['oks(a)n] MH. q. OT ox

p

pack (n.) [prek] pIOK3aK pack (v.) [prek] rraKOBaTh packet ['prek1t] rraKeT pain [pern] 6onh


pair [pea] rrapa

pants [prents] IIITaHhl (pa3r.) parallel ['preralel] rrapaJIJieJihHhIH parcel ['pa:sl] cBepToK

pardon ['pa:dn] H3BHHeHHe parent ['pearant] PO.ll:HTeJIH park [pa:k] rrapK

parrot ['prerat] rrorryrafi pass [pa:s] rrporrycK

pastries ['pe1stnz] rrHp02KHhie pat[pretlIIOXJIOIIbIBaTb

path [pa:e] .ll:OP02KKa patter ['pretan] o6pa3eu;

payee [pe1'i:] rrpe)l.'bHBHTeJih qeKa peace [pi:s] MHP

peach ['pi:tf] rrepcHK pear [pea] rpyrna pearl [p3:1] 2Ke

pence [pens] MH. q. OT penny

penny ['pem] rrettc

perfectly ['p3:f1ktlr] rrperqmctto period ['p1anad] rrepH0.!1: permission [pa'm1fn] pa3perneHHe permit [v.] [pa'm1t] pa3pernaTh persuade [pa'swe1d] y6e)K)J;aTh pessimistic [pes1'm1st1k]

rreCCHMHCTHqeCKHH

petrol ['petral] 6ett3HH phone [faun] Tene<l:>ott pickles ['p1klz] coJieHhe picnic ['p1kmk] IIHKHHK pie [pa1] rrHpor

pineapple ['parnrepl] attattac pint [parntlIIHHTa

plain [plernlrrpOCTOH

plan [plren] IIJiaH

platform ['plretfam] rmaT<l:>opMa platinum ['plretrnam] IIJiaTHHa playfellow ['ple1felau] rrapTHep pleasure ['ple3a] Y.ll:OBOJihCTBHe plenty ['plent1] H306HJIHe pocket- knife ['pok1tnaif]

rrepoqHHHbIB H02KHK poison ['p:i1zn] M

poke [pauk] Tb!KaTh policeman [pa'li:sman]

IIOJIHI\eHCKHH

polish ['pohf] IIOJibCKHH pond [pond] IIPY.ll:

pool [pu:l] 6accefiH

popular ['popjula] rrorryJIHpHhrfi pork [p:i:k] CBHHHHa

porridge ['pon<t] OBCHHaH KaIIIa postage ['paust1d3] rroqToBhie

paCXO.ll:bI


postcard ['p;rns(t)ka:d] IIO'lTOBillI

OTKphlTKll

postman ['p;rns(t)man] rroqTaJihOH post-office ['paus(t)ofrs] rroqTa pouch ['pau1f] C)'MKll

powder ['pauda] rropoIIIOK

practically ['prrekt1kh] rrpaKTIIqec:rrn practice ['prrekt1s] rrpaKTrrKa

practise ['prrekt1s] rrpaKTrrKOBaThCH praise ['pre1z] rrmrnana

preach [pri:1J] rrporroBe)J;OBaTh prefer [pn'fa:] rrpe)J;rroqrrTaTh presence ['prezns] rrprrC)'TCTBrre present (adj.) ['preznt]

IlpllC)'TCTBYJOillllll presume [pn'zju:m] rronaraTh

pretend [pn'tend] rrprrrnopHThCH prevent [pn'vent] rrpe)J;OTBpaI11aTh prick [pnk] YKOJI

prince [prms] rrpllHI(

princess [prm'ses] rrprrHu;ecca principal ['prms1pl]

I!pllHI(Hillla.JihHhlll

print [prmt] rreqaTaTh

prisoner ['pnzana] 3aKJIIOqeHHhill prize [pra1z] rrpeMHH, rrpm probably ['pmbabh] BepoHTHO professional [pm'fefnl]

rrpo<l>eccrroHa.JihHhlli professor [pra'fesa] rrpo<l>eccop

programme ['prnugrrem] rrporpaMMa promise ['pmm1s] 06eI11aTh

properly ['pmpah] rrpaBHJihHO property ['pmpat1] co6crneHHOCTh protect [prau'tekt] 3amrrI11aTh prove [pru:v] )J;OKa3h!BaTh

proverb ['pmv3:b] rroc.JIOBHI(a provide [prn'vaid] cHafoKaTh pudding ['pud1IJ] rry)J;llHr pullover ['pulauva] rrynoBep pulse [pAls] rrynhc

pump [pAIDp] Hacoc pupil [pju:pl] yqeHHK puzzle ['pAzl] 3ara,IIJ(a

p)'.jainas [pa'd:3a:maz] IIIDKaMa

Q

quality ['kwoht1] Kaqecrno quantity ['kwont1t1] Konrrqecrno quart [kwot] KBapTa

R

race [re1s] roHKa

radio ['re1d1au] PMllO

railways ['redwe1z] )J(eJie3HaH )J;Opora raise [re1z] IIO)J;HllMaTh

rang [rreIJ] rrpoIII. Bp. OT ring

raw [r:i:] ChJPOll


realize ['nala1z] pea.Jill30BaTh receive [n'si:v] rronyqaTh recognize ['rekagna1z] Y3HaBaTh record (n.) ['reb:d] peKop)J; refer [n'fa:] OTChIJlaTh

reference ['refr(a)ns] CHOCKa, yrrOMllHaHrre

reflect [n'flekt] OTPa)J(aTh reflection [n'flekfn] OTPa)J(eHrre refreshment [n'frefmant] 3aKYCKa refrigerator [n'fnd:3are1ta]

XOJIO)J;HJihHHK

refuse (v.) [n'fju:z] OTKa3b!BaTh regards [n'ga:dz] rrpHBeT regiment ['red:31man t] rro.JIK regret [n'gret] CO)J(a.JieTh

remain [n'mem] ocTaBaThCH remark [n' ma:k] 3aMeqaHrre repair [n'pea] peMOHT

reply [n'plai] orneT

represent [repn' zent] rrpe)J;CTaBJIHTh respect [ns'pekt] YBa)J(aTh

rest [rest] OT)J;hIX

restaurant ['rest(a)rant] pecTopaH result [n' ZAlt] pe3y.JlhTaT

retail ['ri:ted] B po3Hrrey

retire [n'ta1a] BhlXO)J;llTh B OTCTaBKY return [n't3:n] B03BpaI11aThCH reverend ['revrnnd] rrperro)J;o6Hhlll ring [fll)] 3BOHHTh

risk [nsk] PHCK

rival ['raIVl] correpHllK

rivalry ['ra1vln] correpHrrqecrno road [mud] )J;Opora

roar [r:i:] peB

rob [rob] rpa6rrTh

robbery ['mban] rpa6e)J( robin ['robm] Ma.JillHOBKa roof [ru:t] KPh!IIIa

rose (n.) [rnuz] po3a

royal ['r:i1al] KOpOJieBCKMll rub [rAb] TepeTh

rubber ['rAba] nacTHK ruby ['ru:b1] py6llH rule [ru:l] rrpaBHJIO

s

sack [srek] MeIIIOK

sailor ['seda] MOPHK salad ['srelad] canaT salmon ['sreman] ceMra salty ['s:i:lt1] coneHhlli

sandwich ['srenw1d:3] ['srenwi1J] 6)'Tep6po)J;

sapphire ['srefa1a] carr<t>rrp sausage ['sos1d:3] KOJI6aca save [se1v] crracaTh


scarf [ska:f] nrap<P scenery ['si:n;m] rreihax

scissors ['s1zaz] HOiKHHI(hI secretary ['sekrntn] ceKpeTapb separate (v.) ['separe1t] oT,n:eJrnTh separate (adj.) ['sepant] ['sepnt]

OT,[(eJibHbIB

serious ['s1anas] cepbe3HhIH several ['sevrnl] HeCKOJihKO shake [Je1k] TPHCTH

shape Ue1p] <PopMa sharp [Ja:p] OCTPbIB shave [Je1v] 6pHTb

sheet Ui:t] JIHCT 6YMarH shirt U3:t] py6arnKa

shook Uuk] rrp. Bp. OT shake

shoot Uu:t] cTpeJIHTh shopping ['Jnp11J] IIOKYJ!Ka shout [faut] KpWiaTb sideboard ['sa1db:i:d] 6yclleT sign [sam] 3HaK

signal ['s1gnl] CHrHaJI silly ['s1h] rnyrrhltl: silver ['sdva] cepe6po

similar ['s1mda] cxo,n:HhIH sincerely [sm's1ah] HCKpeHHe single ['Sil)gl] 0,[(HHOKHH situation [s1tju' e1Jn] cHzyaI(H5I size [saiz] pa3Mep

skin [skm] KO)J(a skirt [sk3:t] ro6Ka slang [sire!)] CJI3Hr sleeve [sli:v] PYKaB

slight [sla1t] He6oJibIIIOH slippers ['shpaz] TfilIO'IKH smile [smad] yJihI6Ka smooth [smu:o] rna,n:KHH: snake [sne1k] 3MeH

snow ['snau] cHer soap ['saup] MblJIO

sociable ['saufabl] o6mHTeJibHhIH socks [snks] HOCKH

soldier ['saul«ta] coJI,n:aT solid ['snhd] TBep,n:hIH sore [s:i:] 6oJI5I'IKa

sort [s:i:t] copT

sovereign ['snvrm] MOHapx spare [spea] 3arracHotl:

specially ['spefah] crreI(HaJihHO speck [spek] II5ITHhIIIIKO

spend [spend] TPaTHTh spit [spit] crmeBhIBaTh

splendid ['splendid] BeJIHKOJieIIHhIH sports [sp:i:ts] crropT

spot [spnt] II5ITHO

square [skwea] rmoma,n:h


staff [sta:f] IIITaT

stairs [steaz] JieCTHHI(a stamp [stremp] MapKa start [sta:t] crnpT

state [ste1t] cocTOHHHe stationer ['ste1Jna] rnproBeI(

KaHI(eJIHpCKHMH TOBapaMH

station-master ['ste1Jn ma:sta]

Ha'laJibHHK BOK3aJia steal [sti:l] BOpOBaTb steak [ste1k] 6HcPIIITeKc

stewed ['stju:d] zyrneHbIH stir [st3:] IIOMeIIIHBaTb stomach ['stAIIlak] )J(eey,n:oK stone ['staun] KaMeHb

stove [stauv] IIJIHTa straight [stre1t] rrpHMotl:

straightforward [stre1t' fo:wad]

IIp5IMO

strange [strem«t] CTPaHHhrn strict [stnkt] CTPOrHH

string [stnl)] 6eYJeBKa

substance ['sAbstans] BemecTBo subtract [sab'trrekt] Bhl'IHTaTb subtraction [sab'trrekfn] Bhl'IHTaHHe successful [sak'sesful] y,n:aYIHhIH suddenly ['sAdnh] B,n:pyr

suggestion [sa'«tes1fn] rrpe,n:JIO)J(eHHe suitcase ['sju:t ke1s] YieMo,n:aH

sum [sA!Il] CYMMa

sunburnt ['sAnb3:nt] 3aropeJibIH sunset ['sAnset] 3aKaT

supply [sa'plai] cHa6Th surface ['s3:f1s] rroBepXHOCTh surname ['s3:ne1m] <PaMHJIH5I surroundings [sa'raund11Jz]

OKpeCTHOCTH

sweets [swi:ts] KOHcPeThl syringe ['smn«t] rnrrpHI( system ['s1st1m] CHCTeMa

T

tablet ['trebht] rn6JieTKa

team [ti:m] KOMaH,n:a tears [t1az] cJie3bI teeth [ti:e] 3y6hl

telegram ['tehgrrem] TeJierpaMMa television [teh'v13n] TeJieBH!J:eHHe temperature ['tempn1fa]

TeMIIepazypa

tend [tend] 6h1Th CKJIOHHhIM tender ['tenda] HeiKHbIH

test [test] TecT

text-book ['tekst buk] YYJe6HHK theirs [oeaz] HX

themselves [oem'selvz] caMH therefore ['oeafo:j II03TOMY


thief[8i:f] BOP

thorough ['8Arn] Tll(aTeJinHhlii: though [llau] xoTH

throat [ernut] ropJio

tie (v.) [tai] CBH3bIBaTb tie (n.) [tar] raJICTYK tight [tait] ryroii:

timetable ['tarmterbl] pacmrcamre tin [tin] KOHCepBHaH 6aHKa

tip [tip] YiaeBnre

title ['tart!] 3arnamre

tobacconist [ta'brekamst] Ta6aYIHaH JiaBKa

tomato [ta'ma:tau] rrOMH.IIOP ton [tAn] TOHHa

tongue [tAIJ) H3hlK tooth [tu:e] 3y6

toothache ['tu:eerk] 3y6HaH 60JI1> toothbrush ['tu:ebrAJ] 3y6HaH Il(eTKa tom [t:i:n] rrpwr. IIOT tear

touch [tAtf] TporaTn

traffic [trrefrk] TPaHcrropT travel ['trrevl] rryTernecrnJie

triangle ['trarrel)gl] TPeyroJibHIIK triangular [trar' rel)gjula]

TPeyroJIDHhlll trouble ['trAbl] 6e.n:a

trousers ['trauzaz] 6p10KH truck [trAk] rpy3oBJIK

trunk [trAl)k] CTBOJI .n;epeBa truth [tru:8] rrpaB,n;a

turkey ['t3:kr] JIH,n:eii:Ka twist [twrst] CKpYYIHBaTn

u

uneasy ['An'i:zr] 6ecrroKOii:HDrii:

unfriendly ['An'frendlr] He.n;p)')KeJI106Hhlii:

unsteadily ['An'stedrlr] Hernep.n;o upstairs ['Ap'steaz] Ha BepXHeM

3T!DKe

 

valley ['vrelr] .n;oJIa value ['vrelju:] u;eHHOCTh van [vren] aBTo<l>yproH veal [vi:l] TeJIHTHHa velvet ['velvrt] 6apxaT village ['vrh<l3] .n;epeBHH


visit ['vrsrt] BJI3JIT

visitor ['vrsrta] rroceTHTeJin

 

wagon ['wreg( a)nfrroB03Ka, <l>yproH waistcoat ['werstkaut] )!GIJ!eT

waiting-room ['wertrl) ru(:)m] KOMHaTa

O)l{H,llaHJIH

wake [werk] rrpoc1>maT1>CH wander ['wonda] 6po,n;JITb waste [werst] TPaTHTb

watchmaker ['wotfmerka] YiaCOBII(IIK water-colours ['w:i:takAlaz]

aKBapeJin

wave [werv] BOJIHa

week-end ['wi:k end] YJIKeH.n: weigh [wer] B3BeIIIJIBaTb weight [wert] Bee

welcome ['welkam] rrpHBeCTBOBaTb west [west] 3arra.n;

whatever [wot'eva] 'ITO 6i,r HH wheel (n.) ['wi:l] KOJieco whenever [wen'eva] Kor.n;a 6i,r HJI wherever [wear'eva] r.n:e 61>1 HH whether ['wella] JI1I

whistle ['wrsl] CBJICT wholesale ['haulserl] omoM whose [hu:z] Yieii:

widower ['wrdaua] B)l;OBeu; wild [warld] ,n;JIKJiii:

willingness ['wrlrl)ms] ycep.n;He win [wm] rro6e)!()l;aTb

wind (n.) [wmd] BeTep windmill ['wmmrl]

BeTPHHaH MeJibHIIIJ:a wisdom ['wrzdam] MY.n:pocTb wish [wrf] )KeJiaTn

wolf [wulf] BOJIK

woollen ['wulan] rnepcrnHoii: worn [w:i:n] rrporn. Bp. OT wear wound (n.) [wu:nd] paHa

wrap [rrep] 3aBepThlBaTb

y yard Oa:d] ,n;Bop yours O:i:z] Barn

yourself O:i:' self] ce6H


 

 

K HHr A T P ET b SI

Book Three


CO N TE NTS

LESSON PAGE

1 Hob Gives His First Impressions of England................................ 358

2 Olaf and Pedro Discuss Their Plans............................................... 363

3 Direct and Indirect Speech (I)....................................................................................... 368

4 Olaf Reads Another of His Plays................................................... 373

5 Direct and Indirect Speech (II)....................................................... 378

6 Mrs. Priestley Tells a Story and Mr. Priestley Puts Up

a Hen-house..................................................................................... 384

7 Sentences and Clauses.................................................................... 390

8 Adverb Clauses............................................................................... 396

9 A Visit to Stratford.......................................................................... 400

10 Mood............................................................................................... 405

11 Conditions....................................................................................... 410

12 The Past Conditional.

Test Paper No. 1............................................................................. 413

13 "Should" and "Would"................................................................... 419

14 Olaf Gives us Another "Wiggins" Play.......................................... 423

15 Rules of Grammar and "Standard English"................................... 428

16 Lucille's Story: "The Sand-glass"................................................... 432

17 "Rules of Grammar" Again............................................................ 437

18 Some Strange, but Very Important Verbs. "The Specials" (I)....... 443

19 Hob's Story: "Uncle Theophilus"................................................... 448

20 The "Special" Verbs (II): Short Answers....................................... 453

21 The "Special" Verbs (III): The Emphatic Form. Position of Adverbs. Third Person Singular.

"Susan's Kitchen"............................................................................ 458

22 Olaf Writes a Letter from Oxford (i).............................................. 465

23 The "Specials" Again (IV): To Be. Can.......................................... 472

24 Olaf's Letter from Oxford (II).

Test Paper No. 2............................................................................. 477

25 The "Special" verbs (V): Have....................................................... 487

26 The "Special" verbs (Vl): Do.......................................................... 491

27 Frieda Writes a Letter from Wales.................................................. 494

28 The "Special" Verbs (Vll): Ought.................................................. 502

29 Frieda Tells a Story: King Arthur................................................... 504

30 The "Special" Verbs (Vlll): Need................................................... 511

31 Wales and the Welsh....................................................................... 515

32 The "Special" Verbs (IX): Dare, Used (to).................................... 521

33 The Eisteddfod................................................................................. 524

34 Punctuation...................................................................................... 531

35 The Body......................................................................................... 536

36 A Handful of Poems....................................................................... 542

37 The End of Another Year's Work. Test Paper No. 3.

Good-bye

Mr. Priestley Gets a Surprise......................................................... 549

Glossary for Lesson 36.................................................................. 557

English-Russian Dictionary............................................................ 557


C ODE P>K A HM E

YPOKII CTP.

I Xo6 paccKa3bIBaer o cBoeM rrepBoM Brreqamemrn or AHr.rnrn:.................... 358

2 OJiac):> H Ile):(po o6cy)[{):(aior CBOH IIJiaHhr.......................................... 363

3 Ilp51Mill! li KOCBeHHill! pe% (I)........................................................ 368

4 OJiac):> qITTaer errre O):(HY cB010 mecy.............................................. 373

5 Ilp51Mill! li KOCBeHHill! pe% (II)...................................................... 378

6 MHCCHC IlpHCTJili paCCKa3hIBaer liCTOplilO, a MHCTep

IJpHCTJili CrpOHT K)'P5ITHHK............................................................. 384

7 fJiaBHhre H rrpH):(aroqHhre rrpeMO)KeHH51......................................... 390

8 IlpH):(aroqHhre o6croHTeJihCTBeH Hhle rrpe):(JIO)KeHH51.................... 396

9 BH3HT B Crparc):>op):(....................................................................... 400

10 HaKJioHeHHe..................................................................................... 405

11 YcJIOBHhre rrpe):(JIO)KeHH51....................................................................... 410

12 YcJIOBHhre rrpeMO)KeHH51 B rrporne):(rneM BpeMeHH.

KoHrpOJihHill! pa6ora NQ I................................................................... 413

13 fJiaroJihIShou d H Would................................................................ 419

14 OJiac):> qHraer errre O):(HY rrhecy o ceMhe YIDTHH3............................ 423

15 fpaMMaTH:qeCKHe rrpaBHJia li «CTaH):(apTHb R aHrJIHil:CKHR»........... 428

16 PaccKa3 JiycHJI «IlecoqHhre qachl»......................................................... 432

17 H BHOBh rpaMMarH:qecKHe rrpaBHJia................................................. 437

18 CrpaHHhre, HO oqeHh Ba)!(Hb e «crreIIJiaJibHhie» rnaroJihI(I)....................... 443

19 PaccKa3 Xo6a «Teoc):>HJI»......................................................... 448

20 «CrreIIJiaJibHhie» rnaroJihI(II). KoporKHe oTBeThr...................................... 453

21 «CrreIIJiaJibHhie» rnaroJihl (II ). YcHJIHTeJihHill! c):>opMa. Mecro HapeqHli. TpeTue Jimro e):(HHCTBeHHoro qH:cJia.

«KyxIUI C103aH»................................................................................ 458

22 OJiac):> rrHrner rrHChMO m 0Kcc):>op):(a (I)............................................................... 465

23 H cHoBa «crrerrHaJibHhie» rnaroJihI(IV): To Be. Can................................. 472

24 OJiac):> rrHrner rrHChMO H3 0Kcc):>op):(a (II).

KoHrpOJihHill! pa6ora NQ2................................................................... 477

25 «CrreIIJiaJibHhre» rnaroJihl (V): Have..................................................... 487

26 «CrreIIJiaJibHhre» rnaroJihI(VI): Do...................................................... 491

27 <PpMa rrHrner IIHChMO H3 Y3Jlbca....................................................... 494

28 «CrreIIJiaJibHhre» rnaroJihl (VII): Ought................................................. 502

29 PaccKaJ <PpH):(hI«KopoJih Apryp»........................................................ 504

30 «CrreIIJiaJibHhre» rnaroJihl (VIII): Need................................................. 511

31 Y3JlbC li BaJIHRIIhI............................................................................. 515

32 «CrreIIJiaJibHhie» rnaroJihI(IX): Dare, Used (to)............................ 521

33 AlicreMc):>O):(...................................................................................... 524

34 IlYHKTYaIIH51..................................................................................... 531

35 1IacTH reJia........................................................................................ 536

36 HecKOJibKO CTIDCOTBOpeHMli.................................................................... 542

37 OKoaHHe errre O):(Horo yqe6Horo ro,[(a. KoHrpOJihHill! pa6ora NQ3.

PaccraBaHHe.

MHcrep IlpHCTJIH y):(HBJieH............................................................... 549

fJioccapHli K YPOKY 36........................................................................ 557

AHrJio-pyccKHli CJIOBaph.................................................................... 557


L ESSO N l



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