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Ex.3 Listen to the second part of Alan Bradshaw’s interview, in which he enumerates what plagiarism can involve and number each point in the order in which he mentions it.



Plagiarism can involve:

    1. asking another person to do the work for you;
    2. copying another student's work;
    3. or even paying for someone to do the work for you;
    4. copying another person's work from a book or a journal;
    5. buying the text from the Internet;
    6. copying another person's work from a web-site;

g. downloading the complete text from the Internet.

Script 20 part 3

Ex.4 Listen to the third part of the interview,in which Alan Bradshaw speaks about accidental plagiarism and number each point in the order in which he mentions it.

    1. when you take notes from a book or journal, you copy out some sections and do not make this clear in your notes. Later when you re-read the notes, you forget that they are not your words or ideas;
    2. you borrow your friend's notes, not realizing that some of the words are plagiarized;
    3. you forget to acknowledge another person's words or ideas;
    4. you feel your written work is not good enough;
    5. you do not know that you must not copy a person's words directly;
    6. you do not have time to include the acknowledgments and list of references;
    7. you do not have the skill for expressing another person's ideas in your own words;
    8. you do not know the correct systems for indicating that you are using another person's words or ideas.

 

Ex. 5 Identifying examples of plagiarism.

Write an X next to each action that constitutes plagiarism.

1…… inventing (making up, creating) content for a research paper

2.......... talking to another student during an exam

3.......... submitting a composition that was copied from someone else

4.......... paraphrasing from someone else's article without acknowledging the source

5 ...... taking a test for someone else

6.......... falsifying research data

7 ... writing a composition using someone else's outline, opinions, or ideas

8....... writing information (names, dates, mathematical formulas, and the like) on pieces of paper, articles of clothing, or parts of the body to refer to while taking a test

9 ....... submitting for publication an article which was already published by someone else

10 ….. looking at another person’s answers on a test

 

Introduction (continuation)

Types of Plagiarism

Hamp-Lyons & Courter (1984, pp. 161-166) distinguish between four types of plagiarism:

  • outright copying
  • paraphrase plagiarism
  • patchwork plagiarism
  • stealing an apt term
Original Text While the Education Act of 1870 laid the groundwork for the provision of elementary or primary education for all children in England and Wales, it was not until the implementation of the 1944 Education Act that all girls and boys were entitled to a secondary education. Indeed, the decades immediately following the Second World War saw such a rapid increase in educational provision - in the USA, and many countries of Western and Eastern Europe, as well as in Britain - that some writers refer to the 'educational explosion' of the 1950s and 1960s. The minimum school-leaving age was extended from 14 to 15 years (in 1947) and raised to 16 (in 1971-2), but the proportion of people choosing to pursue their studies beyond this age hurtled upward; by 1971, 30 per cent of 17- year-olds were in full-time education in schools or colleges, compared with 2 per cent in 1902, 4 per cent in 1938, 18 per cent in 1961 and 22 per cent in 1966. The Robbins Report (1963) undermined the view that there was a finite pool of ability - a limited number of people who could benefit from advanced education - and provided ammunition for the expansion of higher education. This expansion took place through the establishment of new universities and growth of existing ones, as well as through the conversion of colleges into polytechnics which could offer degree courses, and the founding of the Open University. In 1970, 17.5 per cent of 18- year-olds entered further or higher education on a full-time basis (compared with 1.2 per cent in 1900, 2.7 per cent in 1938, 5.8 per cent in 1954, and 8.3 per cent in 1960); another three million people enrolled for part-time day classes, evening classes or sandwich courses. Bilton, Bonnett, Jones, Stanworth, Sheard & Webster (1981, p. 381)

· Outright copying is when a student uses exactly the same words as the original author without using quotation marks or saying where the words are from. For example:

Student's text While the Education Act of 1870 laid the groundwork for the provision of elementary or primary education for all children in England and Wales, it was not until the implementation of the 1944 Education Act that all girls and boys were entitled to a secondary education. Indeed, the decades immediately following the Second World War saw such a rapid increase in educational provision - in the USA, and many countries of Western and Eastern Europe, as well as in Britain - that some writers refer to the 'educational explosion' of the 1950s and 1960s.

· Paraphrase plagiarism is changing some of the words and grammar but leaving most of the original text the same. For example:

Student's text The Education Act of 1870 put down the basis for providing primary education for every child in the United Kingdom. It was not, however, until the establishment of the 1944 Education Act that all male and female children were given the right to education at secondary school.

· Patchwork plagiarism is when parts of the original author's words are used and connected together in a different way. For example:

Student's text The right to elementary education for every child in England and Wales was established in the 1870 Education Act. However, the right to secondary education had to wait until the implementation of the 1944 Education Act. Following that act, in many countries of the world, there was such a rapid increase in educational provision that it was called the 'educational explosion' of the 1950s and 1960s.

· Stealing an apt term is when a short phrase from the original text has been used in the students work, possibly because it is so good. For example:

Student's text In England and Wales, all 5 year all children have had the right to an education since 1870. This has not, however, been the case for 11 year olds, who had to wait until 1944 for a national system of secondary education. Once this system was established, though, secondary education expanded rapidly in the decades immediately following the Second World War. (http://www.uefap.com/writing/exercise/plagiar/plagex1.htm)

 

Ex.6 Indentify the types of plagiarism in the following texts:





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