ТОП 10:

Fill in the gaps in these conversations with one word.



 

1)

 

A: Is Roy Parker (1) there, please?

 

B: I'm afraid he's in a meeting. Can 1 take a message?

 

A: Yes, please. My name's Georgia Ashby. Could you please ask Roy to phone me

 

(2)………………..?

 

2)

 

A: Could I (3)…………….. to Antonia Grimshaw, please?

 

B: I'm sorry. There's no reply.

 

A: Just tell her Michael (4) ……………, please, and she can get me (5)…………….

 

my mobile.

 

3)

 

A: Smith and Company. How can 1 help you?

 

B: (6)……………. is Greg Brumfield's sister. Is he there?

 

A: No, I'm afraid he's not at the moment.

 

B: Oh, could you ask him to phone me? He can get me (7)……………. home tonight.

 

 

Complete the phone calls with sentences

 

a) No, thank you. I'll call back later. Goodbye.

 

b) I'm sorry. He's in a meeting at the moment. Can I take a message?

 

c) Yes, please. Can you ask her to phone me at the office?

 

d) Hi Freddy, It's Val. Is Kate there?

 

e) Hello. This is Anthony Marsden here. Could I speak to Matthew Thomas, please?

 

f) OK. Bye.

 

g) No, she's out at the moment. Shall I tell her you called?

 

1)

 

FREDDY Hello?

 

VAL 1)……………………………………..………..

 

FREDDY 2)………………………………………………

 

 


VAL 3)………………………………………………

 

FREDDY 4)………………………………………………

 

VAL Bye.

 

2)

 

RECEPTIONIST Hello, First for Food. Can I help you?

 

ANTHONY 5)………………………………………..

 

RECEPTIONIST 6)………………………………………..

 

ANTHONY 7)………………………………………..

 

RECEPTIONIST Goodbye.

 

Say whether the following statements are true or false. Why?

1. Greetings and endings distract the callers from the subject matter of the conversation and are mere politeness and a complete waste of time.

 

2. You need to develop your questioning techniques in order to elicit the caller’s objective as quickly and as clearly as possible.

 

3. By actively listening we ensure that the caller gives precise information so that the message we receive is accurate.

4. If a difficult caller is a potential client and you cannot possibly let him go to your competitors, try to fob him or pass the buck.

 

5. Mistakes and misunderstandings arise from the subliminal signals you give out while calling.

 

6. Because your caller can't see you, they won't be affected by what you are doing and what's going on around you.

 

7. If you ask a person to explain more than twice they will think you are cloth-eared and cut you off.

8. If the caller is complaining, by any means try to disclaim personal responsibility or pass the buck.

 

 


Unit 2. PRESENTING

 

Starting Presentations

 

 

Work in small groups. Discuss these questions.

 

1) Do you ever have to deliver presentations? If yes, who to?

 

2) What is most difficult for you in public speaking?

 

Public introductions game

 

Take a note card, and write on it three interesting things about you that nobody could guess.

 

The cards will then be mixed and every student will select one of them. Your goal will be to walk around, talk to people, ask questions and find the person whose card you got.

 

Interview that person to get a better picture of the facts. Answer their questions about your card. You will soon be introducing one another to the rest of the team!

 

When you interview a person follow the logical sequence: Who? What? Where? When? How? Why?

 

Write a paragraph about the person:

 

· Begin it with a thesis statement;

 

· Introduce your friend in one short sentence;

 

· Formulate a nice greeting;

 

· Turn your thesis statement into three sentences about your friend, focusing on action, sequence, facts;

 

· Make Things Orderly;

 

· Connect the three facts together in some way;

 

· Make it very short: state the fact, add one more sentence expanding;

 

· Offer a few good wishes.

 

Then the next student takes the floor.

 


Read the text and say which of the named types of presentations you had

 

To deliver.

 

Principles & Types of Speech Communication

 

Whether you are planning to propose a new business plan, lead an informative workshop or speak at a special event, you face the challenge of effective speech communication. Navigating this challenge involves understanding the common types and basic principles of presentations you can give.

 

Informative Presentations

 

Informative presentations are one of the most common types of speech communication. This type of presentation can take many forms, such as reviewing sales figures at a company meeting, leading a training session for a new device, and discussing the history of an organization. Regardless of the situation, an informative presentation always communicates information and ideas to an audience and helps shape the audience's perceptions of the subject. These types of presentations are often organized topically, as a sequence of related subtopics of the overall subject, or chronologically, as a sequence of time-related events. Depending on the topic, informative presentations can also be organized as a demonstration that shows how something occurs or works, or as an explanation that considers patterns of cause and effect or comparison and contrast. When preparing for an informative presentation, one of your most important considerations is how you can best organize your message so your audience will find it engaging and accessible.

 

Persuasive Presentations

 

With a persuasive presentation, your primary purpose is to persuade your audience to believe or act in a particular way. You may want to reinforce or refute beliefs or values of your audience. You may desire to change opinions and spur action. Persuasive presentations can take many forms, such as a sales presentation, business proposal or motivational meeting. Show consideration for your audience's perspective, offer compelling support for your ideas and bridge the distance between the two points of view. Communicate your trustworthiness and competence to the audience.

 


Other Presentations

 

You may encounter a number of special occasions that call for the practice of effective speech communication. For example, you may be asked to give a formal introduction of a guest speaker at an event, to present an honor or award to a co-worker, or to speak at a celebration, retirement, or memorial for another individual. These presentations sometimes require impromptu speaking and sometimes allow for preparation.

 

Basic Principles

 

The basic principles of speech communication remain the same, whether your purpose is to inform or to persuade, or even to speak at a special occasion. To communicate effectively with your audience, you will need to develop your subject in understandable and accessible ways, to navigate the differences between your audience's perspective and your own, and to deliver your message with a dynamic presence, engaging language and effective visual aids.

 

Common Problems

 

A few common pitfalls can occur with speech communication, including too little or too much information, lack of consideration of the audience's point of view, inadequate development of material or ideas, cultural barriers between the speaker and the audience, and poor anxiety management. Take the time to consider and address these problems prior to your presentation to help ensure effective audience engagement and delivery of your message.

 

 







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