SKILLS DEVELOPMENT – APPLYING FOR A JOB. 





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SKILLS DEVELOPMENT – APPLYING FOR A JOB.



6.1 Read the following newspaper ADVERTISEMENT:

‘PREFER A CAMPING TRIP TO A COCTAIL PARTY?’ PATAGONIA has a new position open: Public Relations Associate Job is based in Munich. Candidates must have substantial PR/press experience and strong writing skills. They must have proficiency in technical sports (skiing, kayaking) and outdoor experience. German mother tongue. Environmental background a plus. No glamour … It’s a hard job! Patagonia is a Californian company which designs and distributes functional outdoor clothing.   Send CV with picture to: Nathalie Baudoin Patagonia Gmbh Reitmorstrasse 50 8000 Munich – Germany   The interviews will be in Munich during the last week of February.  

Answer the following questions about the advertisement:

1) What is the name of the company?

2) Is it an American or a German company?

3) What does the company specialize in?

4) What job/position does it advertise?

5) What does ‘Public Relations or PR’ mean?

6) Is the job advertised based in Germany or the United States?

6.2 Fiona Scott decides to apply for the job at Patagonia. Study her CURRICULUM VITAE carefully to see how she has presented the information about herself. Where do you think each of the following headings should be placed (1-6)?

References Education Activities Skills Personal Details Professional Experience

CURRICULUM VITAE

1 ____________   2____________ 1991-1992   1988-1991     1981-1988   3 ____________ 1995-present   1992-1995   Summers of 1990 and 1991   4 ____________ IT Languages Additional 5 ____________     6 ____________     Fiona Scott 52 Hanover Street Edinburgh EH2 SLM Scotland Phone: 0131 449 0237     London Chamber of Commerce and Industry Diploma   University of London BA (Honours) in journalism and Media Studies   Broadfield School, Brighton A levels in German (A), English (B), History (B) and Geography (C)     Public Relations Officer, Scottish Nature Trust Responsible for researching and writing articles on the Trust’s activities and ensuring their distribution to the press Editor of the Trust’s monthly journal In charge of relations with European environmental agencies   Press Officer, Highlands Tourist Board Preparation of promotional materials and brochures Co-ordination of media coverage   The Glasgow Tribune newspaper Two three-month training periods as assistant to the Sports Editor Arranging and conducting interviews Preparation of articles covering local community sports events   Office 2000 and Windows NT, Excel, Internet, PowerPoint Fluent German and proficient in French Driving license (car and motorcycle)     Cross-country skiing, rock climbing and swimming Ski Instructor (grade II) Secretary of the local branch of ‘Action’. (An association organizing sports activities for disabled children)   Geoffrey Williams Professor of journalism University of London   Brenda Denholm Sports Editor The Glasgow Tribune  

It’s very well having a brilliant education. Now you must sell yourself on paper so they’ll be queuing up to interview you. Here are some tips to writing

The winning CV

– Gimmicks and flashy designs can act against you so do your best to keep your CV simple. Brightly colored paper won’t make any difference, except possibly by irritating the employer. Just stick to white and use good quality notepaper. Be concise, factual and neat. Keep your CV to one page, typed.

 

– As a student your work experience – particularly that which is relevant to your chosen field – is unlikely to be extensive. Rather than listing all your Saturday jobs, it is often better to outline your major achievements.

 

– Lay out your CV chronologically. Some employers prefer reverse chronology when looking at a candidate’s work history; this is up to you.

 

– Only name your school if you are applying for a local position where it might be of interest.

 

– Accentuate the positive, omit the negative. If your A-level grades were low, leave them out.

 

– Extra skills such as languages, computer literacy and secretarial skills are important but be honest. Don’t claim fluency in French if you only scraped through your elementary level.

 

– Don’t include out-of-date details; no one cares about the paper round you did when you were 11 years old.

 

– Be certain that the achievements and skills highlighted match the job ad to which you are responding.

 

– Try to show some personality. The key word here is USD – Unique Selling Point – and everyone has one. (In Fiona’s CV, it is her experience with disabled children.) Your objective is to make you stand out from hundreds of other applicants.

 

– Put your name in bold type so it stands out.

 

– Put dates and write all words in full, avoid abbreviations such as ‘Eng.L.’, ’Sci.’, even ‘etc.’, ‘e.g.’ and ‘i.e.’.

 

– Ask someone else to read your CV through carefully to check for mistakes and omissions. Just one is enough to produce a terrible impression.

 

– And be prepared to talk about everything you mention when you go for your interview.

6.3 Look at the outline of the LETTER OFAPPLICATION.

1 f)

 

 
 
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The letter of application normally contains four paragraphs (5-8) in which you should:

– confirm that you wish to apply and say where you learned about the job;

– say why you are interested in the position and relate your interests to those of the company;

– show that you can contribute to the job by highlighting your most relevant skills and experience;

– indicate your willingness to attend an interview (and possibly say when you would be free to attend);

 

Below you will find details from Fiona Scott’s letter of application. Look at the outline of the letter above and indicate where the information below (a - j) should go.

a) Although I am presently employed by a non-profit making organization, It has always been my intention to work in a commercial environment. I would particularly welcome the chance to work for your company as I have long admired both the quality of the products that it provides and its position as a defender of environmental causes. As you will notice on my enclosed CV, the job you are offering suits both my personal and professional interests.
b) I would be pleased to discuss my curriculum vitae with you in more detail at an interview. In the meantime, please do not hesitate to contact me if you require further information. I look forward to hearing from you.
c) Dear Ms Bauldoin d) 8th January 2000

 

e) I am writing to apply for the position which was advertised last month in The Independent.

 

f) 52 Hanover Street Ediburgh EH2 5LM g) Nathalie Baudoin Patagonia Gmbh Reitorstrasse 50 8000 Munich 22 Germany
h) My work experience has familiarized me with many of the challenges involved in public relations today. I am sure that this, together with my understanding of the needs and expectations of sport and nature enthusiasts, would be extremely relevant to the position. Moreover, as my mother is German, I am fluent in this language and would definitely enjoy working in a German-speaking environment.

 

i) Fiona Scott j) Yours Sincerely

 

6.4 Refer back to the job advertisement, CV and letter of application. Do you think that Fiona has a chance of getting the job? What are her strengths and weaknesses? Discuss this in class.

7. PRESENTATION. Speak on the topic ‘Job-Hunting and Applying for a Job’.

TESTS


2nd Year 3rd Term

TEST 3

(Variant 1)

To complete this Test refer to GRAMMAR REFERENCE for revision.

PRONOUNS

1. Fill in the blanks with either/ neither/ none/ both/ of/ nor/ or/ and. Some pronouns can be used more than once.

1) … you postpone the meeting … I will make sure you are not elected chairman of the committee.

2) Neither … them is intelligent.

3) Neither Alfred … Jennifer tolerates her.

4) Either someone deceived her … she has made up the story.

5) … of the students are studying hard. They will fail.

6) He lost both his purse … his glasses.

7) The couple living in the house next door are … college professors.

8) You can have … of these books, but not both.

9) I received two job offers, … of which I accepted.

10) I don’t think she deserves such treatment, … does he.

 

2. Choose the correct word to complete the sentences below.

1) I'd like … cup of tea, please.

other

another

2) The … people were shocked.

other

others

another

3) I've told Pablo, but I haven't told the … yet. I'll tell them when I see them.

other

others

4) They love each … They are such a happy couple.

other

others

another

5) There were three books on my table. One is here. Where are …?

others

the others

the other

6) Some people like to rest in their free time. … like to travel.

Other

The others

Others

7) One person's peach is … person's poison.

another

the other

8) This is not the only answer to the question. There are … .

the others

others

another

9) I saw her … day.

other

another

the other

10) Some … people have taken it.

others

other

another

11) They spent … time arguing.

all

whole

the whole

12) … people at the meeting were bored.

All

Whole

All the

Whole the

13) The … family was there.

all

whole

14) That's … point.

all

whole

the all

the whole

15) I'd travel … over world to find her.

all

the whole

 

 

ADJECTIVES AND ADVERBS

1. Choose the correct variant.

1) The floor looks (clean, cleanly).

2) The crowd yelled (wild, wildly) when the team scored a goal.

3) Most of the students did (well, good) on their tests.

4) Bert spoke (confident, confidently) when he delivered his speech.

5) I tried (hard, hardly) to remember her name but I couldn’t.

6) We (hard, hardly) know each other.

7) You know your boss thinks (high, highly) of you.

8) I am (full, fully) aware that you are not allowed to stop on a motorway.

9) Jim felt (terrible, terribly) about forgetting his son’s birthday.

10) When people are tired they work (slow, slowly).

2. Use the correct comparative levels of the adjectives in the brackets. Insert ‘the’ where necessary.

1) Health and happiness are (important) than money.

2) She is a very intelligent student. She is (intelligent) student in our group.

3) This painting is nowhere near as (famous) as the Mona Lisa.

4) He's far (tall) than her.

5) Some people think that life in a small town is (peaceful) than life in a city.

6) I used to be sad, but now I’m a bit (happy) about my life.

7) Who was the (late) person to leave the office yesterday?

8) The ability to remember things gets (bad) as the years go by.

9) I was a little (prepared) for the last test than for the first one, so I got a worse grade.

10) He is half as (tidy) as you.

11) They are not nearly as (involved) in politics as we are.

 

3. Match the parts.

1 I’m as old … 2 This company is making as … 3 Your dog is far more … 4 My office is almost … 5 My car is … 6 This account is nowhere near as … 7 You are a lot closer to getting …   a) newer than yours. b) a promotion than I am. c) intelligent than mine. d) large as Dave’s. e) many profits as that one. f) as your wife. g) as small as a cupboard.  

 

4. Combine the ideas in the brackets into a DOUBLE COMPARATIVE. You need to decide which of the two given ideas should come first in the comparison to make a logical statement.

Example:

(We ran fast to reach the house. The sky grew dark.)

A storm was threatening. The faster we ran to reach the house the darker the sky grew.

1) (She drove fast. I became nervous.)

Erica offered to take me to the airport, and I was grateful. But we got a late start, so on the way she stepped on the accelerator. I got more than a little uncomfortable. The …

2) (I became confused. I thought about it.)

At first I thought I had understood what she had said, but then the

3) (The air is polluted. The chances of developing respiratory diseases are great.)

Pollution poses many dangers. For example, the

 

PREPOSITIONS

1. Use ‘at/ by/ with/ for/ in/ on with nouns as adverbial modifiers.

1) He’s a lawyer … profession.

2) It’s Ms Blake … the phone. She says it’s urgent.

3) I didn’t have a bottle-opener, so I had to open the bottle … a screwdriver.

4) He began to speak … a low voice.

5) She isn’t here this week. She’s gone to Canada … business.

6) We decided to travel to Australia … boat.

7) We were just … time to see the Queen arrive.

8) I only had a cup of coffee … breakfast.

9) I picked up the wrong suitcase at the airport … mistake.

10) Is there anything interesting … television tonight?

11) He was very reluctant to do it … first, but …the end he agreed.

12) I’d like to go to Paris … a holiday.

13) She’s very shy … nature.

14) I like walking … the rain.

2. Use ‘about/ at/ by/ for/ in/ of/ to/ with’ after be/ get +adjective or participle.

1) There is nothing to be afraid … now.

2) If you are interested … literature you may join our literary society.

3) Ann has always been good … languages.

4) It is said that this diet is rich … vitamins.

5) Don’t be angry … me. I did it by mistake.

6) Paul is getting anxious … his future career.

7) Hurry up or you’ll be late … the plane.

8) He is not ashamed … what he did. In fact he seems to be proud … it.

9) I didn’t think I could ever get used … living in a big city after living in the country.

10) The manager was satisfied … Jim’s work and offered him a pay rise.

11) I am surprised … the number of people who still believe whatever advertisements say.

12). It was good … you to help Dave with his work.

13) I’m not used … driving on the left.

14) I’m a bit short … money. Can you lend me some?

 

PAST PERFECT versus PAST PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

1. Choose between the Past Perfect and Past Perfect Progressive.

1) As soon as I raised my eyes I knew that we had met/had been meeting before.

2) Hardly had I got/been getting offthe bus when it started moving.

3) Maggie took a hot bath after she had worked/had been working in the garden all afternoon.

4) By the time I got to the station the train had left/had been leaving.

5) I had a pleasant surprise when I got to my room: someone had put/had been putting some flowers there for me.

2. Choose the appropriate adverbial of time.

1) She was working in the garden by/at that time.

2) Scarcely had the bell gone when/than the students filled the corridor.

3) The other day/One of these days he called on me to return the money he had borrowed.

4) It wasn’t by/until 2000 that Robert could afford to buy a new car.

5) Her father had been running his own business in/for two years before/after he went bankrupt.

3. Open the brackets using the Past Simple/Past Progressive/Past Perfect/Past Perfect Progressive. Rewrite the whole extract.

I(go) to London for the first time in 2001 when I (be) just a child. My parents (be) already there many times so they (know) the city well. But they never (be) there with a child so they could see a different side of London with me. We (go) out every day and (have) a fantastic time. My parents (study) English for many years so they (have) no difficulty with the language. It (rain) while we (be) there but we (pack) all our waterproof clothes so it (be) no problem. When the time (come) to leave, I (feel) quite unhappy because I (have) such a good time.

EXPRESSING FUTURE ACTIONS

1. Open the brackets using an appropriate future tense where necessary.

A

1) A new coffee shop (open) today. I (meet) my friends there this afternoon.

2) By Christmas I (work) in this office for ten years.

3) I hope you (not/forget) your promise by tomorrow.

4) Look out! We (go) to hit the car in front.

5) Don’t phone too early. I (put) the baby to bed.

6) I (no/go) to speak to her until she (apologize).

7) I (take) my exams on Monday so I think I (stay) in on Saturday night.

8) The Stones (be) married for thirty years in May.

9) The Smiths (get) married in May.

10) He felt that he (have) to count on himself only.

B

Dear Mum,

By the time you receive this letter I (finish) my final exams and, whether they went well or not, I (celebrate). I (start) looking for a job at the end of the summer because I (go) on holiday around Europe for a month, starting next week. Sue (probably/come) with me, although she’s not sure yet. If she does, I’m sure we (have) a great time. I (see) her this evening, as usual, so I expect she (tell) me her decision then. Anyway, my first exam (start) at 9 o’clock tomorrow so I (drive) down to the library to do some last-minute revision. Even though I (study) Russian for four years by the time these exams are over, I feel I’ve still got a lot to learn about the language. Give my love to Sam and Rover.

Yours,

Jason.

READING COMPREHENSION

1. Before reading the text think whether the following statements are True or False.

1. English was already an important world language four hundred years ago.

2. It is mainly because of the United States that English has become a world language.

3. One person out of seven in the world speaks perfect English.

4. There are few inflections in modern English.

5. In English, many verbs can be used as nouns.

6. English has borrowed words from many other languages.

7. In the future, all other languages will probably die out.

2. Read the text ‘English as a World Language’.

English as a World Language

Today, when English is one of the major languages in the world, it requires an effort of imagination to realize that this is a relatively recent thing – that in Shakespeare’s time, for example, only a few million people spoke English, and the language was not thought to be very important by the other nations of Europe, and was unknown to the rest of the world.

English has become a world language because of its establishment as a mother tongue outside England, in all the continents of the world. This exporting of English began in the seventeenth century, with the first settlements in North America. Above all, it is the great growth of population in the United States, assisted by massive immigration in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, that has given the English language its present standing in the world.

People who speak English fall into one of three groups: those who have learned it as their native language; those who have learned it as a second language in a society that is mainly bilingual; and those who use it for practical purpose – administrative, professional and educational. One person in seven of the world’s entire population belongs to one of these three groups. Incredibly enough, 75% of the world’s mail and 60% of the world’s telephone calls are in English.

Certain basic linguistic characteristics also added to its popularity. Old English, like modern German, Russian and Greek, had many inflections to show singular and plural, tense, person, etc. But over the centuries words have been simplified. Verbs now have very few inflections and adjectives do not change according to the nouns.

As a result of the loss of inflections, English has become, over the past five centuries, a very flexible language. Without inflections, the same word can operate as many different parts of speech. Many nouns and verbs have the same form, for example swim, drink, walk, kiss, look, and smile. We can talk about water to drink and to water the flowers; time to go and to time a race; a paper to read and to paper a bedroom. Adjectives can be used as verbs. We warm our hands in front of a fire. Prepositions too are flexible. A sixty-year old man is nearing the retirement; we can talk about a round of golf, cards, or drinks.

One important characteristic of the English language is its openness of vocabulary which involves the free admissions of words from other languages and the easy creation of compounds and derivatives. Most world languages have contributed some words to English at some time, and the process is now being reversed. Purists of the French, Russian and Japanese languages are resisting the arrival of English in their vocabulary.

Geographically, English is the most widespread language on Earth, second only to Mandarin Chinese in the number of people who speak it. It is the language of business, technology, sport, and aviation. This will no doubt continue, although the proposition that all other languages will die out is absurd.

 

3. Write out the answers to the True/False statements in 1.

Example:

1) F in Shakespeare’s time only a few million people spoke English, and the language was not thought to be very important by the other nations of Europe, and was unknown to the rest of the world.

 

4. Which sentence below (1-6) refers to

a) a temporary situation

b) a permanent state or situation

c) an action and event which happened in a finished period of time in the past

g) an action which will happen with a certain degree of probability

d) the present result of something that happened at unspecified time in the past

e) a regular or habitual action

1) English has become a world language because of its establishment as a mother tongue outside England.

2) This exporting of English began in the seventeenth century.

3) One person in seven of the world’s entire population belongs to one of these three groups.

4) Purists of the French, Russian and Japanese languages are resisting the arrival of English in their vocabulary.

5) Those who use it for practical purpose.

6) This will no doubt continue, although the proposition that all other languages will die out is absurd.

Example:

a) 4)

 

5. Translate the marked passage of the text into Russian in writing.

2nd Year 3rd Term

TEST 3

(Variant 2)

To complete this Test refer to GRAMMAR REFERENCE for revision.

PRONOUNS

1. Fill in the blanks with ‘either/ neither/ none/ both/ of/ nor/ or/ and’.

1) … you attend school … you will be expelled.

2) Neither … his opponents spoke at the meeting.

3) … now nor in a hundred years they will find out the truth.

4) She doesn’t make up her face. … do I.

5) … student is studying hard. They will fail.

6) I am looking for opportunities both in this country … abroad.

7) … of us are a little bit overtired.

8) I think they are … impolite. … Bob … Jenny replied to my invitation.

9) … the train … the bus stops at Winsford, so it’s best to come … by car … by underground.

10) … of my friends are rich.

2. Choose the correct word to complete the sentences below.

1) I took the … book back to the library.

other

others

2) I go there every … day.

other

others

another

3) There's no … way to do it.

other

the other

another

4) They love one … -- they're such a happy family.

other

another

5) Many … have said the same.

other

others

6) Please give me … chance.

other

the other

another

7) Some of the speakers went straight to the conference room. … speakers are still hanging around.

The other

The others

Another

8) This cake is delicious! Can I have … slice, please?

other

another

others

9) Where are … boys?

the other

the others

others

10) He was a wonderful teacher. Everyone agreed it would be hard to find … like him.

another

other

the other

11) The supermarket is on … side of the street.

other

another

the other

12) They are arguing … time!

all

whole

all the

13) The book is … about the royal family.

all

whole

the all

the whole

14) He is… responsible.

whole

wholly

15) … in …, it was a success.

All ... all

Whole ... whole

16) It's … in the mind.

ADJECTIVES AND ADVERBS

1. Choose the correct variant.

1) The plane landed (safe, safely) on the runway.

2) This list of names appears (complete, completely).

3) The contract offer sounded (fair, fairly) to me, so I accepted the job.

4) Tina is always patient and speaks (sensitive, sensitively) when helping her friends with their problems.

5) Kate is a (hard, hardly) worker.

6) She used to be a great musician, but she (hard, hardly) plays at all now.

7) The hill rose (high, highly) above the landscape.

8) I always feel (full, fully) whenever I eat a curry.

9) The band played (terrific, terrifically).

10) Dogs make loving, trainable and (gentle, gently) pets.

2. Use the correct comparative levels of the adjectives in the brackets. Insert ‘the’ where necessary.

1) The hotel was surprisingly cheap. I expected it to be (expensive).

2) It’s (funny) story I’ve ever read.

3) I'm much (lazy) than you!

4) I am not nearly as (patient) as her.

5) My salary isn’t so (high) as yours.

6) He is sixty now and he is much (sporty) than he used to be.

7) I’m looking forward to his (near) letter.

8) Are there any (far) questions?

9) He is twice as (old) as his wife.

10) Hitchhiking is far (cheap) than any other means of traveling.

 

3. Match the parts.

1 This route is as … 2 Sandra is not … 3 My house is … 4 He is far more into watching … 5 She is slightly more … 6 My shoes are as wet … 7 I like reading much more … a) sports than his girlfriend. b) as my hair. c) than playing computer games. d) as kind as Jane. e) quick as that one. f) interesting to talk to than him. g) closer than yours.

4. Combine the ideas in the brackets into a DOUBLE COMPARATIVE. You need to decide which of the two given ideas should come first in the comparison to make a logical statement.

Example:

(I became bored. He talked.)

I met a man at a party last night. I tried to be interested in what he was saying, but the more he talked , the more bored I became.

 

1) (I waited long. I got angry.)

My friend told me that she would pick me up at the corner at seven. By seven-thirty she still hasn’t come. The …

2) (You understand more. You are old.)

There are many advantages to being young, but the …

3) (He thought about his family. He became homesick.)

Pierre tried to concentrate on his studying, but his mind would drift to his family and his home. The …

 

PREPOSITIONS

1. Use ‘at/ by/ for/ with/ in/ on/’ with nouns as adverbial modifiers.

1) The journey takes ten minutes … bus and 25 minutes … foot.

2) Violent films should not be shown … TV.

3) I know him … name , but I’ve never actually seen him.

4) It annoys me when he speaks … such a loud voice.

5) Be careful if you are walking home … the dark.

6) I always listen to the news … the radio when driving.

7) The chairman wants the conference to start exactly … time.

8) … the end it was proven that he was guilty.

9) Don’t write to me between 2 and 16 June. I’ll be … holiday then.

10) They met at the station … chance.

11) The car came round the corner … full speed.

12) What would you like to have … dinner?

13) To escape he had to break the window … a chair.

14) You are not allowed to write … pencil.

 

2. Use ‘about/ at/ by/ for/ in/ of/ to/ with’ after be/ get + adjective or participle.

1) I was late … the office again this morning; that is why the boss seems to be angry … me.

2) You are very good … explaining things.

3) I’m tired … eating potatoes every day. Why can’t we have rice for a change?

4) To tell you the truth, I’m not very keen … seeing him again.

5) If you are not satisfied … the service at the hotel, you may complain to the manager.

6) He’s quite nice but I wouldn’t like to be married … him.

7) The jury found him guilty … murder.

8) Are you familiar … this type of machine?

9) The pudding was made … fruit and chocolate.

10) The boss is worried … the present situation.

11) Everyone was shocked … the news.

12) It was stupid … him to act like that.

13) He can’t be so rude … people.

14) The film was not popular … the public.

 

PAST PERFECT versus PAST PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

1. Choose between the Past Perfect and Past Perfect Progressive.

1) All the roads were blocked. It had snowed/had been snowing all night long.

2) She apologized and said she had already had/been having lunch.

3) I knew I had done/had been doing well in my exams even before I received the official results.

4) He had smoked/had been smoking for 20 years before he finally gave it up last year.

5) By the time she ran downstairs to open the door, the policeman had gone/had been going.

 

2. Choose the appropriate adverbial of time.

1) The sun had no sooner hidden behind the clouds than/when we heard the first claps of thunder.

2) I had finished writing the report at/by midnight.

3) They lived in Newcastle by/in 1996.

4) Excuse me, I ordered a coffee half an hour before/ago. Is it ready yet/already?

5) The suspect left the hotel before/after the police arrived.

3. Open the brackets using the Past Simple/Past Progressive/Past Perfect/Past Perfect Progressive. Rewrite the whole extract.

This time last year I (cycle) in the rain along a country road with a friend of mine. We (decide) to go on a cycling holiday in Normandy. Neither of us (be) to France before, but we (know) some French from our time at school. Now we (wonder) if we (make) the right decision. We (plan) our route carefully in advance, but we (forget) one important thing, the weather. It (rain) solidly since our arrival and that night we (end up) sleeping in the waiting room at a railway station. Then the next morning as we (ride) down a steep hill my bike (skid) on the wet road and I (fall off). I (realized) immediately that I (break) my arm, and after a visit to the local hospital I (catch) the next train to Calais for the ferry home.

 

EXPRESSING FUTURE ACTIONS

1. Open the brackets using an appropriate Future Tense where necessary.

A

1) By the time I (qualify) I (study) law for six years.

2) Why don’t you come with us? We (go) to have a lot of fun.

3) By the end of the month she (work) in this company for three weeks.

4) What you (say) if you (see) her?

5) You (work) late tomorrow night?

6) Can you meet Jack at the station, please? He (arrive) at nine o’clock on the train from Oxford.

7) I was sure he (be) late.

8) This time tomorrow I (swim) in the sea.

9) I feel terrible. I think I (have) to go to bed.

10) Her suitcase is too heavy. – I (take) it.

B

Dear Debbie,

Since you want to know what I (do) next week, I thought I (write) and let you know. It (be) a very busy week. On Monday I (go) to York. I probably (be) there for three days and by Wednesday I (meet) every important artist in the town. If everything goes well, I (go) to Newcastle on Thursday morning. There I (meet) the chairman of the Arts Council. Then on Friday and Saturday I (visit) several small towns in the area to see what their galleries are like. By Sunday I (travel) for days and I imagine I (be) very tired. So it looks like I (not/come) to your party on Sunday night. Sorry! I hope you (invite) me to the next one. Give my love to Mike.

Love,

Susan.

READING COMPREHENSION





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