Английский язык с Робинзоном Крузо



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Английский язык с Робинзоном Крузо



Английский язык с Робинзоном Крузо

(в пересказе для детей)

Robinson Crusoe Written Anew for Children by James Baldwin

Адаптировал Илья Франк

Метод чтения Ильи Франка

I WISH TO BE A SAILOR (я хочу быть моряком)

 

MY name is Robinson Crusoe (мое имя = меня зовут Робинзон Крузо). I was born in the old city of York (я родился: «был рожден» в старом городе Йорке), where there is a broad river (где есть широкая река; there is/are — имеется), with ships coming and going (с кораблями приходящими и уходящими).

When I was a little boy (когда я был маленьким мальчиком), I spent much of my time (я проводил много своего времени; to spend — проводить /время/) looking at the river (глядя на реку).

How pleasant was the quiet stream (каким красивым был тихий поток; pleasant — приятный; радостный; милый, симпатичный), flowing, always flowing (текущий, постоянно текущий; to flow — течь; always — всегда, неизменно), toward the far-away sea (по направлению к далекому морю; far-away — далекий, дальний; far — далеко; away — прочь)!

I liked to watch the ships (мне нравилось смотреть на корабли) as they came in (когда они приходили) with their white sails (с белыми парусами) spread to the wind (распростертыми на ветру; to spread — развертывать/ся/; раскидывать/ся/; простирать/ся/; расстилать/ся/).

I liked to think of the strange lands (мне нравилось думать о чуждых землях) which they must have visited (которые они, должно быть, посетили: «должны были посетить»), and of the many wonderful things (и о многих прекрасных вещах/событиях) they must have passed (которые они, должно быть, увидели/с которыми столкнулись).

I wished to be a sailor (я хотел быть моряком). I thought how grand it must be to sail and sail (я думал: как прекрасно, должно быть: «это должно быть» плавать под парусами; sail — парус; to sail — плавать на яхте, ходить на яхте, идти под парусами) on the wide blue sea (по широкому синему морю), with the sky above (с небом наверху) and the waves beneath (и волнами внизу). Nothing could be pleasanter (ничто не могло быть приятнее).

My father wanted me to learn a trade (мой отец хотел, чтобы я научился ремеслу). But I could not bear the thought of it (но я не мог вынести мысли об этом). I could not bear the thought of working every day in a dusty shop (я не мог вынести мысли о работе каждый день в пыльном магазине; dust — пыль).

I did not wish to stay in York all my life (я не желал оставаться в Йорке все жизнь). I wanted to see the world (я хотел увидеть мир). I would be a sailor and nothing else (я хотел быть моряком и никем другим).

My mother was very sad when I told her (моя мать была печальна, когда я сказал ей; to tell — говорить; рассказывать).

A sailor's life, she said, was a hard life (жизнь моряка, сказала она, это тяжелая жизнь). There were many storms at sea (на море бывает много штормов/бурь), and ships were often wrecked (и корабли часто терпят крушение; wreck — крушение).

She told me, too, that there were great fishes in the sea (она также сказала мне, что есть = встречаются в море огромные рыбы), and that they would eat me up if I fell into the water (и что онисъедят меня, если я упаду в воду).

Then she gave me a cake (затем она дала мне пирог), and kissed me (и поцеловала меня). "How much safer it is to be at home (как много = насколько безопаснее быть = оставаться дома)!" she said.

But I would not listen to her (но я не слушал ее). My mind was made up (мое решение было принято; to make up one’s mind — принять решение: «настроить свой разум»; mind — разум; умственные способности; ум; настроение, расположение духа), and a sailor I would be (и /все же именно/ моряком я хотел стать).

When I was eighteen years old (когда мне было восемнадцать лет), I left my pleasant home and went to sea (покинул мой милый дом и отправился в море).

 

pleasant [pleznt], quiet ['kwaIqt], toward [tq'wO:d], spread [spred], visit ['vIzIt], beneath [bI'nJT], world [wq:ld]

 

I WISH TO BE A SAILOR

 

MY name is Robinson Crusoe. I was born in the old city of York, where there is a broad river, with ships coming and going.

When I was a little boy, I spent much of my time looking at the river.

How pleasant was the quiet stream, flowing, always flowing, toward the far-away sea! I liked to watch the ships as they came in with their white sails spread to the wind.

I liked to think of the strange lands which they must have visited, and of the many wonderful things they must have passed.

I wished to be a sailor. I thought how grand it must be to sail and sail on the wide blue sea, with the sky above and the waves beneath. Nothing could be pleasanter.

My father wanted me to learn a trade. But I could not bear the thought of it. I could not bear the thought of working every day in a dusty shop.

I did not wish to stay in York all my life. I wanted to see the world. I would be a sailor and nothing else.

My mother was very sad when I told her.

A sailor's life, she said, was a hard life. There were many storms at sea, and ships were often wrecked.

She told me, too, that there were great fishes in the sea, and that they would eat me up if I fell into the water.

Then she gave me a cake, and kissed me. "How much safer it is to be at home!" she said.

But I would not listen to her. My mind was made up, and a sailor I would be.

When I was eighteen years old, I left my pleasant home and went to sea.

 

I SEE MUCH OF THE WORLD

 

IT was easy to find a ship to my liking; for all kinds of trading vessels go out from London to every country that is known.

One day I met an old sea captain who had been often to the coast of Africa. He was pleased with my talk.

"If you want to see the world," he said, "you must sail with me." And then he told me that he was going again to Africa, to trade with the black people there. He would carry out a load of cheap trinkets to exchange for gold dust and feathers and other rare and curious things.

I was very glad to go with him. I would see strange lands and savage people. I would have many a stirring adventure.

Before ten days had passed, we were out on the great ocean. Our ship was headed toward the south.

The captain was very kind to me. He taught me much that every sailor ought to know. He showed me how to steer and manage the vessel. He told me about the tides and the compass and how to reckon the ship's course.

The voyage was a pleasant one, and I saw more wonderful things than I can name.

When, at last, we sailed back to London, we had gold enough to make a poor man rich.

I had nearly six pounds of the yellow dust for my own share.

I had learned to be a trader as well as a sailor.

It would take too long to tell you of all my voyages. Some of them were happy and successful; but the most were unpleasant and full of disappointment.

Sometimes I went to Africa, sometimes to the new land of South America. But wherever I sailed I found the life of a sailor by no means easy.

I did not care so much now to see strange sights and visit unknown shores.

I cared more for the money or goods that I would get by trading.

At last a sudden end was put to all my sailing. And it is of this that I will now tell you.

 

I UNDERTAKE A NEW VENTURE (я предпринимаю новое рискованное начинание;venture — рискованное предприятие, рискованное начинание)

 

I HAD grown very tired of being a sailor (я стал очень уставшим от /того, что/ был моряком = мне весьма надоело…; to grow — расти; становиться). I was so tired of it that I made up my mind to try something else (я настолько устал от этого, что принял решение попытать что-то другое; to try — пробовать, испытывать).

It happened that I was then in Brazil (случилось, что я был тогда в Бразилии). I bought some land there (я купил там сколько-то = некоторое количество земли; to buy — покупать) and began to open a plantation (и начал открывать = основывать плантацию). The ground was rich (земля/почва была богатой), and it would be easy to raise tobacco and sugar cane (и было бы легко выращивать табак и сахарный тростник).

But I needed many things (но мне нужно было много вещей). I must have plows and hoes and a sugar mill (я должен иметь = у меня должны быть плуги, и мотыги, и сахарную мельницу = сахарный завод). Above all (и прежде всего: «выше всего») I must have men (у меня должны быть люди) to do the work on the plantation (чтобы делать работу = чтобы работать на плантации).

But neither men nor tools could I get in Brazil (но ни людей, ни инструментов я не мог достать в Бразилии).

I sent to London for the tools (я послал в Лондон за инструментами; to send — посылать). I tried to buy some slaves of the planters near me (я попытался купить рабов у плантаторов около меня), but they had not enough for themselves (но у них не было достаточно для самих себя).

"We will tell you what to do (мы скажем тебе, что делать)," they said. "We will fit out a trading vessel for Africa (мы снарядим торговое судно в Африку). We will put aboard of it everything that you need (мы доставим на борт все, в чем нуждаешься = что будет тебе нужно; to put — помещать, класть, ставить; aboard — на борту; на борт). As for your part (что касается твоей части), you shall be the manager of the business (ты будешь управляющим этого дела/предприятия); and you shall do the trading for us (и будешь заниматься торговлей за нас). You need not put in a penny of your own (тебе не нужно вкладывать ни пенни своих /денег/)."

"But how is that going to help me (но как это поможет мне)?" I asked (спросил я).

"Listen, and we will tell you (послушай, и мы скажем тебе)," they said. "With the goods which we send (с товарами, которые мы посылаем), you will buy as many black slaves as the ship will hold (ты купишь столько черных рабов, сколько выдержит корабль; to hold — держать). You will bring them here (ты привезешь их сюда), and we will divide them equally (и мы разделим их поровну; equal — равный, одинаковый). You shall share with us (ты поделишься с нами), just as though you had paid the money (как если бы ты заплатил деньги; just — точно, как раз, именно, поистине /о месте, времени, образе совершения действия/; to pay — платить)."

The plan pleased me very much (этот план мне очень понравился). I figured that each one of us would have thirty or forty slaves (я рассчитал, что каждый из нас получит тридцать или сорок рабов).

It was very foolish of me to go to sea again (было весьма глупо с моей стороны вновь отправиться в море); but the offer was so good (но предложение было столь хорошим = выгодным) that I could not say No (не мог сказать «нет»).

The ship was soon fitted out for the voyage (корабль был вскоре подготовлен для путешествия/поездки; to fit — быть впору, быть в самый раз, подходить /к чему-л./; /также to fit out/ снаряжать, оснащать). Her load was not very heavy (груз не был очень тяжелым). But there were plenty of goods (но было много товаров) such as were most fit for trade (таких, которые были наиболее подходящими для торговли).

There were boxes of red and blue beads (ящики красного и синего бисера), of bits of glass (кусочков стекла), and of other trinkets (и других безделушек). There were also knives and hatchets (были также ножи и топорики) and little looking-glasses (и маленькие зеркала). We reckoned that each one of these would buy a slave (мы подсчитали, что каждый /предмет/ из этих купит = позволит купить раба).

The ship was to carry fourteen men (корабль должен был везти четырнадцать человек) besides the captain and myself (помимо капитана и меня). She (он /корабль в англ. языке — женского рода/) was as fine a little vessel (был таким прекрасным маленьким судном = суденышком) as ever sailed from the coast of Brazil (которое когда-либо отходило в море от берега Бразилии).

 

tired ['taIqd], bought ['bO:t], plantation [plxn'teIS(q)n], tobacco [tq'bxkqu], sugar ['Sugq], plow ['plau], hoe ['hqu], could [kud], aboard [q'bO:d], business ['bIznqs], divide [dI'vaId], equally ['i:kwqlI], figure ['fIgq], again [q'ge(I)n], load ['lqud], heavy ['hevI], hatchet ['hxtSIt], buy ['baI], carry ['kxrI], coast ['kqust], Brazil [brq'zIl]

 

I UNDERTAKE A NEW VENTURE

 

I HAD grown very tired of being a sailor. I was so tired of it that I made up my mind to try something else. It happened that I was then in Brazil. I bought some land there and began to open a plantation. The ground was rich, and it would be easy to raise tobacco and sugar cane. But I needed many things. I must have plows and hoes and a sugar mill. Above all I must have men to do the work on the plantation.

But neither men nor tools could I get in Brazil.

I sent to London for the tools. I tried to buy some slaves of the planters near me, but they had not enough for themselves.

"We will tell you what to do," they said. "We will fit out a trading vessel for Africa. We will put aboard of it everything that you need. As for your part, you shall be the manager of the business; and you shall do the trading for us. You need not put in a penny of your own."

"But how is that going to help me?" I asked.

"Listen, and we will tell you," they said. "With the goods which we send, you will buy as man black slaves as the ship will hold. You will bring them here, and we will divide them equally. You shall share with us, just as though you had paid the money."

The plan pleased me very much. I figured that each one of us would have thirty or forty slaves.

It was very foolish of me to go to sea again; but the offer was so good that I could not say No.

The ship was soon fitted out for the voyage. Her load was not very heavy. But there were plenty of goods such as were most fit for trade.

There were boxes of red and blue beads, of bits of glass, and of other trinkets. There were also knives and hatchets and little looking-glasses. We reckoned that each one of these would buy a slave.

The ship was to carry fourteen men besides the captain and myself. She was as fine a little vessel as ever sailed from the coast of Brazil.

 

I AM SHIPWRECKED (я потерпел кораблекрушение; to be shipwrecked — потерпеть кораблекрушение)

 

AT length all things were ready for the voyage (наконец все вещи были готовы к путешествию; length — длина; продолжительность), and I went on board the ship (и я вступил на борт корабля).

It was just eight years to the day (было как раз восемь лет ото дня: «ко дню») since I had left my father and mother (с тех пор, как я покинул отца и мать; to leave — оставлять, покидать) and my pleasant home in good old York (и мой милый дом в добром старом Йорке).

I felt that I was doing a foolish thing (я чувствовал, что делаю глупую вещь; to feel — чувствовать); but I did not dare to say so (не осмеливался сказать это: « сказать так»; to dare to do smth. — осмелиться сделать что-л.).

The wind was fair (ветер был попутный; fair — красивый, прекрасный /уст., обычно о женщинах/; /мор./ попутный /о ветре/). The sails were spread (паруса были распущены; to spread — развертывать). Soon we were out to sea (вскоре мы были в открытом море).

For several days the weather was fine (в течение нескольких дней погода была хорошей). The ship sped swiftly on her way (корабль шел быстро по своему курсу; to speed — двигаться поспешно; мчаться; торопиться), and every one was happy and hopeful (и каждый был счастлив и полон надежд).

Then a great storm came up from the southeast (затем большой шторм пришел с юго-востока). I had seen many fierce storms (я видел много жутких штормов), but never one so terrible as this (но никогда столь ужасного, как этот).

We could do nothing (мы не могли сделать ничего) but let the ship drive before the wind (кроме как позволить кораблю идти по ветру: «перед ветром»). Day after day we were tossed by the waves (день за днем нас бросали волны: «мы были бросаемы волнами»); and day after day we expected the ship to go down (и день за днем ожидали, /что/ корабль потонет: «пойдет вниз»).

The storm grew fiercer and fiercer (шторм становился /все/ свирепее и свирепее; to grow — расти; становиться; fierce — жестокий, лютый, свирепый). The men gave themselves up for lost (люди /команда/ считали себе погибшими; to give smb. up for lost — считать кого-л. погибшим; lost — потерянный, пропавший; to lose — терять).

But on the twelfth day the wind went down (однако на двенадцатый день ветер стих). The waves were not so strong (волны не были такими сильными). We began to hope for our lives (мы начали надеяться на жизнь: «на наши жизни»).

Early the next morning a sailor cried out (рано следующим утром моряк выкрикнул), "Land (земля)! land!"

I ran out of the cabin to look (я выбежал из кабины посмотреть; to run — бежать). But at that very moment the ship struck upon a great bank of sand (но в тот же самый момент корабль наткнулся на большую песчаную отмель; very — самый; to strike — ударять; bank — вал, насыпь; банка, отмель) over which the fierce sea was rolling (над которой перекатывалось свирепое море; to roll — катиться).

She stopped short (корабль резко остановился сразу; short — короткий; резко, круто). She could not move (он не мог двинуться). The great waves dashed over her deck (большие волны заливали палубу: «перехлестывали через палубу»; to dash — /о массе жидкости/ разбиваться /обычно с силой и грохотом,/ хлестать; брызгать, плескать). All of us would have been washed overboard (все мы были бы смыты за борт) if we had not hurried back to the cabin (если бы не поспешили обратно в каюту).

"What shall we do (что на делать)?" cried the men (кричали люди = матросы).

"We can do nothing (мы ничего не можем сделать)," said the captain. "Our voyage is at an end (наше путешествие подошло к концу: «есть при конце»), and there is no longer any hope for our lives (и больше нет какой-либо = ни малейшей надежды нам остаться в живых). We can only wait for the ship to break in pieces (можем только ждать, пока корабль не разломится на куски)."

"Yes, there is one chance for our lives (да = и все же есть один шанс на спасение: «для наших жизней»)!" cried the mate (воскликнул помощник). "Follow me (следуйте за мной)!"

In the lull of the storm (во временном затишье шторма; lull — временное затишье; временное успокоение; перерыв) we rushed again to the deck (мы снова ринулись на палубу). One of our boats was still there (одна из наших лодок все еще была там).

We slung her over the ship's side (мы спустили через борт корабля; to sling — бросать, швырять; спускать на ремнях). We jumped aboard of her (мы прыгнули на борт = запрыгнули на нее). We cut her loose (мы отрезали канаты/освободили ее; to cut — резать; loose — свободный, непривязанный), and floated away upon the wild sea (и отплыли по дикому = бурному морю; to float — плыть /неуправляемо, удерживаться на плаву/).

No boat could live in such a sea as that (никакая лодка не могла выжить в таком море, как то). But we saw land ahead of us (мы видели землю впереди нас); and perhaps some of us might be cast alive upon the beach (и, возможно, некоторые из нас смогут быть выброшены живыми на берег; to cast — бросать, кидать, швырять; выбрасывать /о море, волнах/; beach — береговая полоса; пляж).

This was our only hope (это была единственная надежда).

The raging waves (неистовые волны; to rage — беситься, злиться; бушевать, свирепствовать /о буре, эпидемии, страстях и т. п./; rage — ярость, гнев, бешенство) carried us nearer and nearer to the shore (тащили нас ближе и ближе к побережью; to carry — везти; нести).

We could see the breakers (волны прибоя: «ломатели») dashing upon the great rocks (бьющие о большие скалы). The land looked more frightful than the sea (земля выглядела более устрашающей, чем море; fright — сильный внезапный испуг; страх).

Then all at once (затем, совершенно неожиданно; at once — сразу, немедленно), a huge wave overset the boat (огромная волна перевернула лодку). We had no time to speak or think (мы не имели времени поговорить или подумать). We were thrown out into the raging sea (были выброшены в неистовствующее море; to throw — бросать). We were swallowed up by the waves (мы были проглочены волнами).

 

dare ['deq], several ['sevrql], fierce ['fIqs], before [bI'fL], expect [Ik'spekt], grew [gru:], roll ['rqul], move [mu:v], hurry ['hArI], cabin ['kxbIn], break ['breIk], piece [pi:s], chance [tSQ:ns], follow ['fOlqu], lull [lAl], rush [rAS], boat ['bqut], slung ['slAN], cut [kAt], loose [lu:s], float ['flqut], upon [q'pOn], ahead [q'hed], cast [kQ:st], alive [q'laIv], beach [bi:tS], rage ['reIG]

 

I AM SHIPWRECKED

AT length all things were ready for the voyage, and I went on board the ship.

It was just eight years to the day since I had left my father and mother and my pleasant home in good old York.

I felt that I was doing a foolish thing; but I did not dare to say so.

The wind was fair. The sails were spread. Soon we were out to sea.

For several days the weather was fine. The ship sped swiftly on her way, and every one was happy and hopeful.

Then a great storm came up from the southeast. I had seen many a fierce storm, but never one so terrible as this.

We could do nothing but let the ship drive before the wind. Day after day we were tossed by the waves; and day after day we expected the ship to go down.

The storm grew fiercer and fiercer. The men gave themselves up as lost.

But on the twelfth day the wind went down. The waves were not so strong. We began to hope for our lives.

Early the next morning a sailor cried out, "Land! land!"

I ran out of the cabin to look. But at that very moment the ship struck upon a great bank of sand over which the fierce sea was rolling.

She stopped short. She could not move. The great waves dashed over her deck. All of us would have been washed overboard if we had not hurried back to the cabin.

"What shall we do?" cried the men.

"We can do nothing," said the captain. "Our voyage is at an end, and there is no longer any hope for our lives. We can only wait for the ship to break in pieces."

"Yes, there is one chance for our lives!" cried the mate. "Follow me!"

In the lull of the storm we rushed again to the deck. One of our boats was still there.

We slung her over the ship's side. We jumped aboard of her. We cut her loose, and floated away upon the wild sea.

No boat could live in such a sea as that. But we saw land ahead of us; and perhaps some of us might be cast alive upon the beach.

This was our only hope.

The raging waves carried us nearer and nearer to the shore.

We could see the breakers dashing upon the great rocks. The land looked more frightful than the sea.

Then all at once, a huge wave overset the boat. We had no time to speak or think. We were thrown out into the raging sea. We were swallowed up by the waves.

 

I AM CAST UPON A STRANGE SHORE (я выброшен на незнакомый берег)

THE next thing I knew (следующая вещь, которую я узнал = следующее, что я понял) I was lying on the beach (/это то, что/ я лежал на пляже) and the breakers were rolling over me (а огромные волны перекатывались через меня).

 

 

Some wave, kinder than others (какая-то волна, более мягкая/тихая, чем другие; kind — добрый, любезный, сердечный; податливый; покладистый, послушный), must have carried me there (должно быть, отнесла меня туда).

I got upon my feet (я встал на ноги) and ran as fast as I could (и побежал так быстро, как мог).

I saw another wave coming after me (я увидел другую волну, идущую за мной = догоняющую меня). It was high as a hill (она была высокой, как холм).

I held my breath and waited (я задержал дыхание и ждал; to hold — держать). In a moment the wave was upon me (через мгновение волна была на мне). I could feel myself carried farther and farther (я мог чувствовать себя утащенным дальше и дальше = как меня тащило…) toward the dry land (по направлению к сухой земле).

The water covered me (вода накрыла меня). But I held my breath and tried to swim (я задержал дыхание и постарался плыть).

The wave became smaller and weaker (волна становилась /все/ меньше и слабее; to become — становиться) as it rolled farther and farther up the long beach (по мере того, как она катилась дальше вверх на длинную береговую полосу).

At last I could keep my head and shoulders above water (наконец я смог держать голову и плечи над водой). I could breathe again (я снова мог дышать).

I felt the ground under my feet (я почувствовал землю под ногами). I struck out with all my might for the dry land (я устремился со всей своей силой = изо всех сил к суше; to strike — ударять; to strike out — направляться, устремляться).

But now the water was rushing back from the shore (но теперь вода неслась/хлынула обратно от берега; to rush — бросаться, мчаться, нестись, устремляться). I feared lest I should be carried out to sea again (я боялся, как бы нt быть утащенным снова в море; lest — чтобы не, как бы не).

I swam (плыл; to swim), I ran (бежал; to run). I held on to the rocks (держался = цеплялся за камни; to hold). Then another great wave came and lifted me high upon the shore (затем другая огромная волна подняла = отнесла меня высоко на берег).

In another moment I was safe on dry land (в следующее: «в другое» мгновение я был в безопасности на суше).

I was worn out with the hard struggle (я был утомлен тяжелой борьбой; to wear — носить /об одежде, обуви/; to wear out — изнашивать; изнурять), I lay down upon the green grass (я лег на зеленую траву; to lie — лежать; to lie down — ложиться; прилечь). I looked up at the sky (я взглянул вверх на небо) and thanked God that I was alive and safe (и поблагодарил Бога за то, что был живым и в невредимым).

After I had rested a little while (после /того как/ я отдохнул немного) I arose and looked around me (я встал и огляделся вокруг; to arise — подниматься, вставать).

Far out from the shore I could see the ship (далеко от берега я мог видеть корабль). It was still lying where it had stuck in the sand (он все еще лежал там, где он застрял в песке; to stick — втыкать; застрять). The waves were dashing over it (волны захлестывали его: «перехлестывали через него»).

"How was it possible for me to swim so far (как было возможно мне проплыть так далеко)?" I asked myself (спросил я себя).

Then I began to think of the men that were with me (затем я стал думать о людях, которые были со мной). Had any of them been saved (был ли кто-нибудь из них спасен)?

I walked along the shore for a mile or more (я прошелся вдоль берега милю или больше). I looked in every spot for some signs of my friends (я заглядывал в каждый угол за какими-либо знаками = признаками/следами моих друзей; spot — пятнышко; место, участок местности).

In one place I found a hat (в одном месте я нашел шляпу; to find — находить); in another, a cap (в другом — шапку); And in still another, two shoes that were not mates (а еще в другом — два башмака, которые не были парой).

But of the men themselves I saw nothing (но от самих людей не видел ничего = но из самих людей я никого не видел). All were drowned in the deep sea (все утонули в глубоком море; to be drowned — утонуть: «быть утонувшим»).

 

fast [fQ:st], after ['Q:ftq], moment ['mqumqnt], farther ['fRDq], cover ['kAvq], breath [breT], became [bI'keIm], shoulder ['Squldq], above [q'bAv], breathe [brJD], ground ['graund], shore [SL], arose [q'rquz], possible ['pOsqbl], ask [Q:sk], sign ['saIn], friend ['frend], shoe [Su:], drown ['draun]

 

I AM CAST UPON A STRANGE SHORE

 

THE next thing I knew I was lying on the beach and the breakers were rolling over me. Some wave, kinder than others, must have carried me there. I got upon my feet and ran as fast as I could. I saw another wave coming after me. It was high as a hill.

I held my breath and waited. In a moment the wave was upon me. I could feel myself carried farther and farther toward the dry land.

The water covered me. But I held my breath and tried to swim.

The wave became smaller and weaker as it rolled farther and farther up the long beach.

At last I could keep my head and shoulders above water. I could breathe again.

I felt the ground under my feet. I struck out with all my might for the dry land.

But now the water was rushing back from the shore. I feared lest I should be carried out to sea again.

I swam, I ran. I held on to the rocks. Then another great wave came and lifted me high upon the shore.

In another moment I was safe on dry land.

I was worn out with the hard struggle, I lay down upon the green grass. I looked up at the sky and thanked God that I was alive and safe.

After I had rested a little while I arose and looked around me.

Far out from the shore I could see the ship. It was still lying where it had stuck in the sand. The waves were dashing over it.

"How was it possible for me to swim so far?" I asked myself.

Then I began to think of the men that were with me. Had any of them been saved?

I walked along the shore for a mile or more. I looked in every spot for some signs of my friends.

In one place I found a hat; in another, a cap; And in still another, two shoes that were not mates.

But of the men themselves I saw nothing. All were drowned in the deep sea.

 

I MAKE ME A RAFT

 

THERE was a great deal of water in the ship’s hold. But the cabin and the storerooms were dry. The boxes of food had not been touched by the water.

I was very hungry, but I had no time to lose. So I filled my pockets with dry biscuits and ate them as I went about.

There were many things on the ship. They might be very useful to me if I had them on shore. But there was no boat, and how could I carry them there?

"I will make a raft." I said to myself.

There were several long pieces of timber on the deck. I tied a rope to each of these so that it would not float away. Then I dropped them, one by one, over the ship’s side.

After this I slid down my rope into the water, and tied these timbers together. They formed a framework that was strong and would not sink.

On top of this framework I laid all the boards I could find.

I now had a very good raft. It was large enough to carry a great many things. All the time I was building it I was planning how to load it.

In the cabin there were three strong boxes, such as sailors use. These I emptied. Then I carried them out and let them down upon my raft.

Of all the things on board, I would need food the most. So I filled the first chest with bread, rice, cheese, and a few pieces of meat.

I found also a small bag of grain, of which I took good care. It was barley.

Then I began to look around for clothing, and found enough to do for many a day.

While I was getting these together I happened to see the carpenter’s chest. It was full of tools.

It was hard work to get it on the raft. I lifted and pulled. I pulled and lifted; and at last I had it alongside of the other boxes. How tired I was!

 

I CARRY SOME THINGS ASHORE (я приношу некоторый вещи на берег)

 

IT was now past noon (было уже время после полудня), and the tide was coming in (и прилив приближался). I could not stop to rest (я не мог остановиться отдохнуть).

"I have food, I have clothing, I have tools (у меня есть еда, у мнея есть одежда, у меня есть инструменты)," I said to myself (сказал я себе). "What do I need next (что мне нужно следующим = теперь/еще)?"

 

 

Then I thought of the wild animals (затем я подумал о диких животных) and wild men (и диких людях) that I might meet on the shore (которых я мог встретить на берегу). "How shall I protect myself from them (как я буду защищать себя от них)?" I said.

In the captain's room I found two good guns (в комнате капитана я нашел два хороших ружья) with a bag of shot and a powderhorn (с сумкой дроби и пороха; bag — мешок; сумка). There were also two old swords (там были также две старые шпаги), very rusty and dull (очень ржавые и тупые), and a pair of big pistols (и пара больших пистолетов).

By looking around (осмотревшись), I found also three small kegs of powder (я обнаружил также три маленьких бочонка пороха; keg — бочонок /емкостью до 10 галлонов[2]/; a powder keg — пороховой бочонок). Two of these were dry (два из них были сухими), but the other was wet (но другой был мокрым) and good for nothing (и ни на что не годился: «и хороший для ничего»).

It took more than an hour to get all these safely placed on my raft (заняло больше часа уложить все это в сохранности на мой плот; safely — в сохранности; безопасно; благополучно). I now had quite a heavy load (у меня теперь была довольно тяжелая поклажа), and I began to wonder (и я начал задаваться вопросом; to wonder — удивляться; интересоваться; размышлять) how I should take it to the shore (как я должен доставить это на берег).

I had no oars nor any sail for my raft (у меня не было ни весел, ни паруса для моего плота). But the water was smooth (но вода была гладкой), the tide was flowing in (и был прилив: «поток приливал»), and a gentle wind was blowing toward the land (и тихий ветер дул по направлению к суше).

I loosed the rope (я ослабил веревку) that held the raft to the ship (которая держала плот к кораблю = которой плот был привязан к кораблю), and soon began my little voyage (и скоро начал мое маленькое путешествие).

The tide was now so high (прилив был сейчас столь высоким) that the dry land was much farther away (что суша была намного дальше) than when I came out (чем когда я отправился: «вышел» к кораблю). But the raft floated smoothly along (но плот плыл ровно; to go along — двигаться вперед), and drew nearer and nearer to the shore (и приближался ближе и ближе к берегу; to draw — тащить; тянуть; подходить, приближаться).

Just as I thought myself safe (как только я подумал, что я в безопасности), I found that I was entering a strong current (я обнаружил, что вхожу в сильное течение) which carried me into a narrow bay (которое относит меня в узкий залив) far from my first landing place (вдалеке от моего первого места «приземления» = прибытия /на берег/).

There the raft stuck fast (там плот застрял; to stick — торчать; застревать; fast — крепко) on an ugly sand bar (на ужасной песчаной отмели; ugly — безобразный, уродливый; мерзкий; скверный), and was like to be tipped over (и был готов быть перевернутым = перевернуться).

But the tide was still rising (но прилив все поднимался). Soon the raft floated free (вскоре плот поплыл свободно) and glided slowly along again with the current (и снова медленно скользил по течению: «с течением»).

In a short time I found that I was being carried up (через короткое время я обнаружил, что меня несло: «я был несом») into a little river with high banks on each side (в маленькую речку с высокими берегами на каждой стороне).

With a piece of plank for an oar (с куском доски = с доской вместо весла; plank — толстая и широкая гладко оструганная доска, планка) I pushed the raft toward the shore on my right (я толкнул плот к берегу справа). The water was now so shallow (вода была теперь столь мелкой) that I could reach the bottom (что я мог достать до дна).

The raft floated slowly onward (плот медленно плыл вперед) until it reached a little cove (пока не достиг маленькой бухточки) into which I pushed it (в которую я втолкнул его). The water there was quite still (вода была там вполне тихой/неподвижной).

I looked around for a place to land (я осмотрелся, ища место, чтобы пристать к берегу). But the banks were steep (но берега были отвесными), and if I ran one end of my raft upon the shore (и если бы я наехал одним концом моего плота на берег), the other end might sink so low as to slide all my goods into the water (другой конец мог опуститься/погрузиться так низко, что /мог/ сбросить/уронить все мои товары в воду; to slide — скользить; совать; зд. сбросить, дать соскользнуть).

The best I could do was to wait (самое лучшее, что я мог сделать, это ждать) till the tide was at its highest (пока прилив не достигнет максимальной высоты: «был при своем наивысшем»). Then I might push a little farther inland (тогда я мог толкнуть немного дальше от моря; inland — вглубь страны/суши) where the bank was somewhat lower (где берег был несколько ниже).

This I did (это я сделал = так я и сделал).

The tide rose higher and higher (прилив поднимался /все/ выше и выше). At last, to my joy (наконец, к моей радости), the water reached the top of the bank (вода достигла вершины берега). It covered a level spot of ground beyond (она покрыла ровную/плоскую полосу земли за этой вершиной; level — уровень; плоский, ровный; spot — пятнышко; крапинка; небольшой участок местности; beyond — за, по ту сторону).

I waited a little longer (я подождал немного дольше). The water on the level space was a foot deep (вода на ровном месте была в фут глубиной). The tide was beginning to flow out (поток стал отступать: «вытекать» = начался отлив).

With all my might I pushed the raft into this shallow place (со всей своей силой я толкнул плот на мелкое место). The tide ebbed fast (поток отступил быстро). Soon the raft was left high and dry on the land (вскоре плот был оставлен высоко и сухим на земле).

It was easy now to unload the goods (теперь было легко разгрузить товар/добро) and carry them to a safe place (и отнести его в безопасное место).

 

past [pQ:st], food [fu:d], wild ['waIld], animal ['xnIm(q)l], might ['maIt], protect [prq'tekt], gun [gAn], powder ['paudq], sword [sO:d], pair ['peq], pistol [pIstl], oar [O:], smooth [smHD], gentle [Gentl], current ['kAr(q)nt], reach [ri:tS], push [puS], cove [kquv], beyond [bI'jOnd], level ['lev(q)l], shallow ['Sxlqu]

 

I CARRY SOME THINGS ASHORE

 

IT was now past noon, and the tide was coming in. I could not stop to rest.

"I have food, I have clothing, I have tools," I said to myself. "What do I need next?"

Then I thought of the wild animals and wild men that I might meet on the shore. "How shall I protect myself from them?" I said.

In the captain's room I found two good guns with a bag of shot and a powderhorn. There were also two old swords, very rusty and dull, and a pair of big pistols.

By looking around, I found also three small kegs of powder. Two of these were dry, but the other was wet and good for nothing.

It took more than an hour to get all these safely placed on my raft. I now had quite a heavy load, and I began to wonder how I should take it to the shore.

I had no oars nor any sail for my raft. But the water was smooth, the tide was flowing in, and a gentle wind was blowing toward the land.

I loosed the rope that held the raft to the ship, and soon began my little voyage.

The tide was now so high that the dry land was much farther away than when I came out. But the raft floated smoothly along, and drew nearer and nearer to the shore.

Just as I thought myself safe, I found that I was entering a strong current which carried me into a narrow bay far from my first landing place.

There the raft stuck fast on an ugly sand bar, and was like to be tipped over.

But the tide was still rising. Soon the raft floated free and glided slowly along again with the current.

In a short time I found that I was being carried up into a little river with high banks on each side.

With a piece of plank for an oar I pushed the raft toward the shore on my right. The water was now so shallow that I could reach the bottom.

The raft floated slowly onward until it reached a little cove into which I pushed it. The water there was quite still.

I looked around for a place to land. But the banks were steep, and if I ran one end of my raft upon the shore, the other end might sink so low as to slide all my goods into the water.

The best I could do was to wait till the tide was at its highest. Then I might push a little farther inland where the bank was somewhat lower.

This I did.

The tide rose higher and higher. At last, to my joy, the water reached the top of the bank. It covered a level spot of ground beyond.

I waited a little longer. The water on the level space was a foot deep. The tide was beginning to flow out.

With all my might I pushed the raft into this shallow place. The tide ebbed fast. Soon the raft was left high and dry on the land.

It was easy now to unload the goods and carry them to a safe place.

 

Английский язык с Робинзоном Крузо

(в пересказе для детей)



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