ТОП 10:

The 5 Sensory Approach to Business Presentations



You’re in a conference room. You’re giving a PowerPoint presentation to several of your colleagues...and your boss.

 

On a scale of 1 to 5, how sensual is this experience? And just how important is sensuality in business-related PowerPoint presentations?

By Laura Bergells

Believe it or not, live PowerPoint presentations can be sensory, full-bodied experiences. Sadly, many presenters focus primarily on the visual elements of PowerPoint, adding a dizzying display of wild backgrounds, pictures, charts, animations, and bullet points...simply because PowerPoint makes it easy to do so.

While focusing solely on visuals may stroke a presenter’s ego, it does very little to provoke a positive emotional response from the audience. That’s because information arrives in our brains through all five of our senses: taste, touch, sight, smell, and sound.

Just how sensual are you willing to be when you give a PowerPoint presentation? Put another way, how well do you address each of the following five sensory areas?

See PowerPoint Run...The best sensual presenters only use visual elements to activate the audience’s imagination or emotions. As an audience member, when you feel your brain cells spark or your heartbeat increase upon seeing a graphic, you’ve been visually stimulated! Great visuals can stir your emotions…and spur you to take positive action. Sensual presenters skip endless, needless, hard-to-read, or boring visuals. They might be easy to add, but they do nothing positive for the audience.

Now Hear This... Sound is an incredibly important part of any presentation. I went to hear a widely recognized expert on PowerPoint design speak last week...and almost went straight to sleep! It wasn’t his visuals, it was his voice! His slides might have been eye candy, but they weren’t enough. His bored monotone didn’t match his widely purported passion for demonstrating and promoting excellent multimedia visuals. The most sensual presenters use a voice that projects enthusiasm for the subject matter at hand. And they skip the cheesy “ta-dahs” and other trite sound bites that inspire groans and eye-rolls!

The Aroma of PowerPoint...If you think that you can’t smell a PowerPoint presentation, think again. Oh, the fragrance of dry-erase markers on a white board! The odor of perspiration, day-old pizza, and stale cologne that lingers from the coworkers who met in the room before you! What kind of scent best compliments your message? An aromatherapist I know anoints her room with essential oils that elicit audience attention and interest. If this sounds too new-age goofy for you, how about a fresh pot of brewed coffee, a vase of flowers, a bowl of fruit – there are many business-acceptable ways to improve the aroma of your PowerPoint!

PowerPoint is a Banquet...What’s a business meeting without a nosh? Tasty little treats can really win over an audience. Sensual presenters score big points for providing a box of donuts, pizza, pastry, boxed lunch or other edible goodies for their audiences.

Feel the PowerPoint...As an audience member, you’re always touching or feeling something during a PowerPoint presentation. Super sensory presenters provide pleasant or useful items for their groups to feel. If you’re presenting, consider pencils and paper, product samples, and porcelain cups instead of styrofoam. Make sure the room temperature is a little cool...the more bodies you have in the room, the warmer it will get (and warmth can make the audience sleepy!)

 

 


SUPPLEMENT

 

Presentation Skill Self-evaluation

 

To be a more effective presenter, it is useful to evaluate your own presention skills. The following self evaluation form can help you identify areas you should try to improve. Please read each item below and rank yourself from 1 to 5 based on how frequently you believe you adhere to the item (1=never and 5=always). Then concentrate on the points that you have ranked with low numbers when you are trying to improve your oral presentation skills.

When you have finished, compute your score and see what improvement in your presentation skills you should make.

 

Question rank
1) I determine some basic objectives before planning a presentation.  
2) I analyze the values, needs and constraints of my audience.  
3) I write down some main ideas first, in order to build a presentation around them.  
4) I incorporate both a preview and review of the main ideas as my presentation is organized.  
5) I develop an introduction that will catch the attention of my audience and still provide the necessary background information.  
6) My conclusion refers back to the introduction and, if appropriate, contains a call-to-action statement.  
7) The visual aids I use are carefully prepared, simple, easy to read, and have impact.  
8) The number of visual aids will enhance, not detract, from my presentation.  
9) If my presentation is persuasive, arguments are used that are logical and that support my assertions.  
10) I use anxiety to fuel the enthusiasm of my presentation, not hold me back.  
11) I ensure the benefits suggested to my audience are clear and compelling.  
12) I communicate ideas with enthusiasm.  
13) I rehearse so there is a minimum focus on notes and maximum attention paid to my audience.  
14) My notes contain only "key words" so I avoid read up from a manuscript or technical paper.  
15) My presentations are rehearsed standing up and using visual aids.  
16) I prepare answers to anticipated questions, and practice responding to them.  
17) I arrange seating (if appropriate) and check audio-visual equipment in advance of the presentation.  
18) I maintain good eye contact with the audience at all times.  
19) My gestures are natural and not constrained by anxiety.  
20) My voice is strong and clear and is not a monotone.  

 

Evaluaute your score:

· If you scored between 80-100, you are an accomplished speaker who simply needs to maintain basic skills through practice.

· If your total score was between 60-80, you have the potential to become a highly effective presenter.

· If your score was between 40 and 60, this resource can help you significantly.

· If you scored between 30 and 40, you should show dramatic improvement with practice.

· If your total was below 30, roll up your sleeves and dig in. It may not be easy – but you can make excellent progress if you try.

 

 

Listener feedback

 

Name of Speaker:
Topic:
Did the Speaker . . . (check one of the boxes) Yes Needs Work
· Speak loud enough?    
· Use a good rate of speech?    
· Use Visuals?    
· Use Notecards?    
· Make eye contact with the audience?    
· Use appropriate body language?    
· Finish within the time limit?    
· Make the main points clear?    
One thing I learned from the speech:
One recommendation for the speaker:

 


Effective Speaking

Student Self-Evaluation of Presentation

 

Speaker’s Name:

 

Title of Presentation:

 

  Excellent Good Needs Work Comments
Introduction        
· Greeting/Intro        
· Topic      
· Preview      
Body        
· Main points are clear        
· Supporting examples and definitions are relevant      
Conclusion        
· Reviewed main points        
· Thanked the audience      
Delivery        
· used note cards        
· used visuals      
· spoke loud enough      
· used a good rate of speech      
· used appropriate verbal language      
· used appropriate body language      
· had good eye contact      
· answered questions well      
· entire presentation did not go over the time limit      

 

Two things that I did very well:

1.

 

2.

 

Two things that I would like to improve next time:

1.

 

2.

 


Effective Speaking

Teacher's Evaluation of Presentation

 

Speaker’s Name:

 

Title of Presentation:

 

  Excellent Good Needs Work Comments
Introduction        
· Greeting/Intro        
· Topic      
· Preview      
Body        
· Main points are clear        
· Supporting examples and definitions are relevant      
Conclusion        
· Reviewed main points        
· Thanked the audience      
Delivery        
· used note cards        
· used visuals      
· spoke loud enough      
· used a good rate of speech      
· used appropriate verbal language      
· used appropriate body language      
· had good eye contact      
· answered questions well      
· entire presentation did not go over the time limit      

 

Comments:

 

 







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