What shall the crew do during bunkering operations?



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What shall the crew do during bunkering operations?



What shall the crew do during bunkering operations?

Why shall care be taken?

3 What does the Pollution Emergency Team do?

 

 

FIRE/EXPLOSION

The first few minutes after a fire is discovered are vital and the SOLAS Training Manual and the measures to be taken should be completely familiar to all Officers and key crew members on board. Ref: Annex I # 1,2,3.

Action Checklist

The Master's priorities should be:

Ensure safety of passengers and crew

Limit damage to vessel and cargo

Prevent environmental pollution.

 

Sound Emergency Stations; Emergency Response Squad Leader shall investigate extent of the fire and assess risk of explosion.

All cargo operations must cease and spaces battened down. Close fire and watertight doors as appropriate and assess ventilation requirements.

Notify the shore authorities and Local Coastal State.

General Arrangement Plan, Damage Control/Fire Fighting Plan, Capacity Plan, Tank Plan, Cargo Plan and stability information made ready for the local fire control officer -if in port. Prepare/locate list of passengers and crew.

Boats shall be swung out to embarkation level and stored with extra equipment -if at sea.

If possible the vessel should be headed in such a direction as to avoid the spread of fire due to wind action, unless dense smoke is hampering fire fighting operations.

An urgency or distress message dispatched.

It should be remembered that fire is the most common casualty encountered at sea. Emergency fire practices must be regularly carried out and be as thorough and realistic as possible to exercise all crewmembers in their emergency duties.

Initial Report Format

a) Name and call sign of vessel/flag.

b) Name and position/rank of reporting personnel.

c) Date and time (specify local or GMT) when fire was discovered.

d) Latitude and longitude to nearest minute, or name of port and berth number.

e) Course and speed.

f) Nature and extent of fire.

g) Location of fire.

h) Brief but clear description of any losses and/or damages, and general condition of

i) vessel (whether disabled, listing, etc.).

j) Actual envisaged pollution threat,

k) State of sea.

l) Creative measures taken and/or planned to be taken.

m) Assistance required.

n) Assistance available locally,

o) Surveys arranged or taking place.

p) o) Arrangements for further communications.
p) Agencies and/or persons already notified.

q) Tank soundings and description of tank contents (diesel, fresh water or ballast),

r) Number of casualties and brief description of their injuries,

s) Weather conditions and forecast.

 

What must Master do with cargo operations?

Whom shall Master notify?

What are the types of lifeboats?

What do wooden or metal lifeboats require?

What is the best course from the damaged ship?

 

 

LIFERAFTS.

Cargo- and passenger vessels as well as fishing crafts are equipped with approved liferafts. The number, type and carrying capacity derive from regulations and additional requirements.

Approved are liferafts throw overboard type, liferafts davit launched type & large liferafts without any protective canopy and usable either way up.

Liferafts are automatically inflatable. For launching they may be thrown overboard or designed and positioned near launching appliances for launching fully manned.

All liferafts are so installed that they can be launched quickly, secure­ly and safely - if possible by one man - even with 20° list, over the high side. For that reason liferafts are nowadays almost always stowed on swing­ing-out storage frames, inclined ramps or equivalent appliances.

Every inflatable liferaft is made from coated synthetic fabric and as a rule is packed tightly folded in a plastic container. The weight of a liferaft including its packaging and full distress equipment lies between 100 kg and 185 kg depending on the size of the raft.

Every inflatable liferaft afloat withstands all weather conditions at sea for 30 days, it is operable over an air temperature range -30°C to +66°C, it can be thrown into the water in its container, it has adequate stability in a seaway when inflated, the floor is waterproof and can be inflated for insulation against cold. The inflatable liferaft has a canopy of a clearly visible color, which protects the occupants from the effects of the weather. It has a light 6n the top, inside & outside, an arrangement for collecting rainwater and a fitting for the radar transponder or the aeri­al of the portable radio apparatus.

For inflation and to connect the inflated raft to the ship there is a release painter line, which is cut, using a knife. Lifelines are provided all around, inside & outside. Fitted to every opening is a boarding arrange­ment for persons in the water.

 

What safety equipment are cargo and passenger vessels equipped with?

How are all liferafts installed?

What is every master obliged?

What is the responsibility of the Maritime Rescue Coordinating Centre ?

How should every drill be planned?

2 Where are tasks or instructions ac­cepted attentively?

What should all crew members do before lowering a lifeboat?

What is the main material used in a ship?

Where are paints stowed?

THE LOADED VOYAGE

 

Servicing hatch covers, removing cargo residues and temporary drain plugs.

Consulting the hatch cover manufacturer's manual. Logging the action taken.

Realising that cargo deteriation during voyages leads to claims against the shipowner.

 

Using the ship's own records as evidence.

Daily checking during the voyage of:

hatch covers

hold access points

lashings

hold temperatures

bilges

air and sea temperatures and dewpoints

Logging the steps taken.

Observing carriage instructions for cargo and recording if adverse weather prevents ventilation.

Responsibility of the master alone for course and speed, whatever voyage instructions say.

Informing interested parties of any changes to course and speed for reasons of safety.

ARRIVAL AT THE DISCHARGE PORT

Being vigilant during discharging.

Opening hatch covers only when safe.

Guarding against water penetration.

Inspecting cargo and reporting damage to the owner.

Establishing the quantity of cargo discharged.

Supervising stevedores' unloading practices.

Taking care of cargo left on board.

Shipowner's responsibility for cargo ashore.

Protecting the ship's interest if discharged cargo is at risk.

Insisting that breakbulk cargoes are handled correctly.

Discharging bulk cargoes safely and paying special attention to the problems posed by grabs:

excessive leakage

impact on hold linings

deliberate striking of the hold to dislodge residues

Trimming residues while within easy reach.

CLOSING SEQUENCE Closing Sequence

This video can only be an introduction to cargo loss prevention.

Helping to win the war against claims by:

doing your homework

asking for instructions

insisting on information

checking cargo condition and quantity

recording your actions

communicating with third parties

thinking ahead

End credits

 

 

What shall the crew do during bunkering operations?

Why shall care be taken?

3 What does the Pollution Emergency Team do?

 

 

FIRE/EXPLOSION

The first few minutes after a fire is discovered are vital and the SOLAS Training Manual and the measures to be taken should be completely familiar to all Officers and key crew members on board. Ref: Annex I # 1,2,3.

Action Checklist

The Master's priorities should be:

Ensure safety of passengers and crew

Limit damage to vessel and cargo

Prevent environmental pollution.

 

Sound Emergency Stations; Emergency Response Squad Leader shall investigate extent of the fire and assess risk of explosion.

All cargo operations must cease and spaces battened down. Close fire and watertight doors as appropriate and assess ventilation requirements.

Notify the shore authorities and Local Coastal State.

General Arrangement Plan, Damage Control/Fire Fighting Plan, Capacity Plan, Tank Plan, Cargo Plan and stability information made ready for the local fire control officer -if in port. Prepare/locate list of passengers and crew.

Boats shall be swung out to embarkation level and stored with extra equipment -if at sea.

If possible the vessel should be headed in such a direction as to avoid the spread of fire due to wind action, unless dense smoke is hampering fire fighting operations.

An urgency or distress message dispatched.

It should be remembered that fire is the most common casualty encountered at sea. Emergency fire practices must be regularly carried out and be as thorough and realistic as possible to exercise all crewmembers in their emergency duties.

Initial Report Format

a) Name and call sign of vessel/flag.

b) Name and position/rank of reporting personnel.

c) Date and time (specify local or GMT) when fire was discovered.

d) Latitude and longitude to nearest minute, or name of port and berth number.

e) Course and speed.

f) Nature and extent of fire.

g) Location of fire.

h) Brief but clear description of any losses and/or damages, and general condition of

i) vessel (whether disabled, listing, etc.).

j) Actual envisaged pollution threat,

k) State of sea.

l) Creative measures taken and/or planned to be taken.

m) Assistance required.

n) Assistance available locally,

o) Surveys arranged or taking place.

p) o) Arrangements for further communications.
p) Agencies and/or persons already notified.

q) Tank soundings and description of tank contents (diesel, fresh water or ballast),

r) Number of casualties and brief description of their injuries,

s) Weather conditions and forecast.

 



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