Point out the subject and say by what it is expressed. Translate. 





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Point out the subject and say by what it is expressed. Translate.



Simple sentence.

1. Point out two-member sentences (say whether they are comp­lete or elliptical) and one-member sentences.

1. He stared amazed at the calmness of her answer. (Galsworthy)

2. We must go to meet the bus! '.Wouldn't do to miss it. (Cronin)

3. Obedient little trees, fulfilling their duty. (Kahler)

4. Lucretius knew very little about what was going on in the world. Lived like a mole in a burrow. Lived on his own fat like a bear in winter. (Douglas)

5. He wants to write a play for me. One act. One man. Decides to commit suicide. (Mansfield)

6. A beautiful day, quite warm. (Galsworthy)

7. "What do you want?" "Bandages, stuff for wounded." (Heym)

8. "How did he look?" "Grey but otherwise much the .same." "And the daughter?" "Pretty." (Galsworthy)

9. And then the silence and the beauty of this camp at night. The stars. The mystic shadow water. The wonder and glory of all this. (Dreiser)

10. "I'll see nobody for half an hour, Macey," said the boss. "Understand? Nobody at all." (Mansfield)

11. "Mother, a man's been killed." "Not in the garden?" interrupted her mother. (Mansfield)

12. Garden at the Manor House. A flight of grey stone steps leads up to the house. The garden, an old-fashioned one, full of roses. Time of year, July. Basket chairs, and a table covered with books, are set under a large yew-tree. (Wilde)

Point out the subject and say by what it is expressed. Translate.

1. At that moment the postman, looking like a German army officer, came in with the mail. (Mansfield) 2. The clock struck eight. There was no sign of any of the other guests. (Huxley) 3. Now, there is something peculiarly intimate in sharing an um­brella. (Mansfield) 4. Together we walked through the mud and slush. (Mansfield) 5. Something impersonal and humble in that action seemed to reassure the Consul. (Cronin) 6. The sight of them, so intent and so quick, gave Bertha a curious shiver. (Mansflied) 7. Eight o'clock in the morning. Miss Ada Moss lay in a black iron bedstead, staring up at the ceiling. (Mansfield) 8. Still, the good of mankind was worth working for. (Galsworthy) 9. Some­times the past injects itself into the present with a peculiar force. (Heym) 10. Forgetting some things is a difficult matter. (Voynich) 11. To cross from one end to the other was difficult because of the water. (Heym) 12. "A Person doesn't have to be rich to be clean," Charles said. (Braine) 13. There was an eagerness and excitement in the faces of the men. (Heym) 14. ...and Timothy's was but one of hundreds of such homes in this City of London... (Galsworthy) 15. Let's get out quick. It's no good wast­ing time. (Maugham) 16. "Very well," said Soames, "then we know where we are." (Galsworthy) 17. Now, to go through a stormy night and with wet clothes, and, in addition, to be ill nourished and not to have tasted meat for a week or a month, is about as severe a hardship as a man can undergo. (London) 18. She did not know. The "No" was stronger than her craving to be in Frisco's arms and forget this dreary existence. (Prichard) 19. The mining industry might make wealth and power for a few men and women. But the many would always be smashed and battered beneath its giant treads. (Prichard) 20. Yes, that did sound rather far-fetched and absurd. (Mansfield) 21. This, of course, in her present mood, was so incredibly beautiful... She began to laugh. (Mansfield) 22. To live on good terms with people one must share their work and interests. (Prichard) 23. These three deemed themselves the queens of the school. (Ch. Bronte) 24. Who were these people? What are they? (Galsworthy) 25. His was the harsh world of reality. No one could walk around his drawing. (Stone) 26. Governing the district of Cremmen wasn't turning out to be an easy and pleasant job. (Heym) 27. The firing increased" in volume. (Heym) 28. High and low all made fun of him. (Thackeray) 29. For a woman to look at her best is a point of discipline. (James) 30. Your coming home has made me as foolish as a young girl of nineteen. (Abrahams)

3. State the nature of it. Translate.

1. It was dusky in the dining-room and quite chilly. (Mans­field) 2. The bell rang. It was lean, pale Eddie Warren in a state of acute, distress. (Mansfield) 3. Oh! Oh! Oh! It was a little house. It was a little pink house. (Mansfield) 4. But in her bosom there was still that bright glowing place. It was almost unbearable. (Mansfield) 5. She sat up, but she felt quite dizzy, quite drunk. It must have been the spring. (Mansfield) 6. It was marvelous to be made love to like that. (Prichard) 7.It is the moon that makes you talk to yourself in that silly way. (Shaw) 8. It is very distressing to me, Sir, to give this information. (Dickens) 9. He took the path through the fields: it was pleasanter than the road. (Huxley) 10. If this is liberty, it isn't going to mean a thing. (Heym) 11. It was now almost four-thirty in the afternoon. (Dreiser) 12. I took a good room. It was very big and light and looked out on the lake. (Hemingway)

Point out the predicate and say to what type it belongs.

I. Presently she grew tired of that and looked across at her sister. (Galsworthy) 2. You shall have as many dances as you like. I shan't dance with anyone except you and Maxim. (Du Maurier) 3. Well, do you feel any better now? (Priestley) 4. Harry was enjoy­ing his dinner. (Mansfield) 5. Alice went on, he ought to stop doing nothing and criticizing everybody. (Lindsay) 6. Everything is being taken down and used against you. (Lindsay) 7. The story will only get repeated and exaggerated. (Du Maurier) 8. But I've got to have a word with him. We got to do something about it. (Prichard) 9. She became bitter and unapproachable. (Thome) 10. Her marriage was more or less fixed for the twenty-eighth of the month. They were to sail for India on September the fifth. (Lawrence) 11. Leila's partner gave a little gasping laugh. (Mansfield) 12. You are to go straight to your room. You are to say nothing of this to anyone. (De la Roche) 13. He was a country doctor. He died young. (Sanborn)14. I began to stammer my apologies. He would not listen to me. (Du Maurier) 15. To walk in this way behind him seemed to Annette already a sufficient marvel. (Murdoch) 16. A ship — the Vestris — is reported to be arriving at Joppa. (Douglas) 17. Led was having a little new sort of weeping fit daily or every other day. (Wescott) 18. Even now he was able to find a thin excuse for that young idiot. (Kahler) 19. Do not delay, there is no time. Teacher Williams lies, dead- already. (Buck) 20. The grey house had ceased to be a home for family life. (Buck) 21. Kit--had been told, to do nothing in particular. (Lindsay) 22. Lately he'd made efforts to bring the matter up with Brian or Colin. (Lindsay) 23. The sky shone pale. (Mansfield) 24. These days are finished. They are blotted out. I must begin living all over again. (Du Maurier) 25. Next day, by noon, I was up and dressed, and sat wrapped in a shawl by the nursery hearth. (Ch.Bronte) 26. And all the while he felt the presence of Pat and had to keep on resisting the impulse to turn round. (Lindsay) 27. But Abramovici remained quiet. (Heytn) 28. Morning broke quiet and hushed, subdued as if holding its breath. (Abrahams) 29. There were a number of people out this afternoon. And the band sounded louder and gayer. (Mansfield) 30. This has proved surprisingly difficult. (Murdoch)

Subject – Predicate agreement

Point out all the independent elements and say by what they are expressed.

1. Nicholas, unfortunately, had passed an unquiet night. (Cronin)

2.Nevertheless, despite this reasoning there remained in the Consul's breast that strange sense of jealousy. (Cronin)

3. How fortunate to have such a reliable couple in the house. Naturally, he counted on the Burtons as an official standby. (Cronin)

4. I am a human being, senor, and must take advantage of my opportunities. Frankly, I am accustomed to good wine. (Cronin)

5. He was surprised, evidently, to find Sally so much at home and bustling about like that. (Prichard)

6. She was quite unconcerned, as a matter of fact, about being left alone in the camp. (Prichard)

7. Perhaps her colonial upbringing had something to do with it. (Prichard)

8. It was still too early for his ride, but he did not go back to bed, he wasn't deeply worried, to be sure, but he knew that he wouldn't be able to sleep. (Kahler)

Composite sentence

Relative clauses

15. Insert who, whom, that, which, as.

1. One oil lamp was lit in the bow, and the girl ___ Mr. Tench had spotted from the bank began to sing gently a melancholy, sentimental and contended song about a rose had been stained with true love's blood. (Greene) 2. None of us ___were there will ever forget that day. (Greene) 3. I don't believe all ___ they write in these books. (Greene) 4. The great protective, cover under ___the Germans had operated was torn from them. (Heym) 5. I call her probably the very worst woman ___ ever lived in the world... (Dickens) 6. I saved such of the equipment ___ could not be rep­ laced, and I saved the personnel... (Heym) 7. Pettinger was pleased that Prince. Yasha, ___ was a cool observer and a military man... estimated the situation exactly as he, himself, did. (Heym) 8. There was a feeling in the air and a look on faces ___ he did hot like. (Galsworthy) 9. All ___ I can remember is that you 'gave a beautiful performance. (Thornton)

Simple sentence.

1. Point out two-member sentences (say whether they are comp­lete or elliptical) and one-member sentences.

1. He stared amazed at the calmness of her answer. (Galsworthy)

2. We must go to meet the bus! '.Wouldn't do to miss it. (Cronin)

3. Obedient little trees, fulfilling their duty. (Kahler)

4. Lucretius knew very little about what was going on in the world. Lived like a mole in a burrow. Lived on his own fat like a bear in winter. (Douglas)

5. He wants to write a play for me. One act. One man. Decides to commit suicide. (Mansfield)

6. A beautiful day, quite warm. (Galsworthy)

7. "What do you want?" "Bandages, stuff for wounded." (Heym)

8. "How did he look?" "Grey but otherwise much the .same." "And the daughter?" "Pretty." (Galsworthy)

9. And then the silence and the beauty of this camp at night. The stars. The mystic shadow water. The wonder and glory of all this. (Dreiser)

10. "I'll see nobody for half an hour, Macey," said the boss. "Understand? Nobody at all." (Mansfield)

11. "Mother, a man's been killed." "Not in the garden?" interrupted her mother. (Mansfield)

12. Garden at the Manor House. A flight of grey stone steps leads up to the house. The garden, an old-fashioned one, full of roses. Time of year, July. Basket chairs, and a table covered with books, are set under a large yew-tree. (Wilde)

Point out the subject and say by what it is expressed. Translate.

1. At that moment the postman, looking like a German army officer, came in with the mail. (Mansfield) 2. The clock struck eight. There was no sign of any of the other guests. (Huxley) 3. Now, there is something peculiarly intimate in sharing an um­brella. (Mansfield) 4. Together we walked through the mud and slush. (Mansfield) 5. Something impersonal and humble in that action seemed to reassure the Consul. (Cronin) 6. The sight of them, so intent and so quick, gave Bertha a curious shiver. (Mansflied) 7. Eight o'clock in the morning. Miss Ada Moss lay in a black iron bedstead, staring up at the ceiling. (Mansfield) 8. Still, the good of mankind was worth working for. (Galsworthy) 9. Some­times the past injects itself into the present with a peculiar force. (Heym) 10. Forgetting some things is a difficult matter. (Voynich) 11. To cross from one end to the other was difficult because of the water. (Heym) 12. "A Person doesn't have to be rich to be clean," Charles said. (Braine) 13. There was an eagerness and excitement in the faces of the men. (Heym) 14. ...and Timothy's was but one of hundreds of such homes in this City of London... (Galsworthy) 15. Let's get out quick. It's no good wast­ing time. (Maugham) 16. "Very well," said Soames, "then we know where we are." (Galsworthy) 17. Now, to go through a stormy night and with wet clothes, and, in addition, to be ill nourished and not to have tasted meat for a week or a month, is about as severe a hardship as a man can undergo. (London) 18. She did not know. The "No" was stronger than her craving to be in Frisco's arms and forget this dreary existence. (Prichard) 19. The mining industry might make wealth and power for a few men and women. But the many would always be smashed and battered beneath its giant treads. (Prichard) 20. Yes, that did sound rather far-fetched and absurd. (Mansfield) 21. This, of course, in her present mood, was so incredibly beautiful... She began to laugh. (Mansfield) 22. To live on good terms with people one must share their work and interests. (Prichard) 23. These three deemed themselves the queens of the school. (Ch. Bronte) 24. Who were these people? What are they? (Galsworthy) 25. His was the harsh world of reality. No one could walk around his drawing. (Stone) 26. Governing the district of Cremmen wasn't turning out to be an easy and pleasant job. (Heym) 27. The firing increased" in volume. (Heym) 28. High and low all made fun of him. (Thackeray) 29. For a woman to look at her best is a point of discipline. (James) 30. Your coming home has made me as foolish as a young girl of nineteen. (Abrahams)

3. State the nature of it. Translate.

1. It was dusky in the dining-room and quite chilly. (Mans­field) 2. The bell rang. It was lean, pale Eddie Warren in a state of acute, distress. (Mansfield) 3. Oh! Oh! Oh! It was a little house. It was a little pink house. (Mansfield) 4. But in her bosom there was still that bright glowing place. It was almost unbearable. (Mansfield) 5. She sat up, but she felt quite dizzy, quite drunk. It must have been the spring. (Mansfield) 6. It was marvelous to be made love to like that. (Prichard) 7.It is the moon that makes you talk to yourself in that silly way. (Shaw) 8. It is very distressing to me, Sir, to give this information. (Dickens) 9. He took the path through the fields: it was pleasanter than the road. (Huxley) 10. If this is liberty, it isn't going to mean a thing. (Heym) 11. It was now almost four-thirty in the afternoon. (Dreiser) 12. I took a good room. It was very big and light and looked out on the lake. (Hemingway)





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