Ex. 3. Fill in the blanks with a suitable word.



Мы поможем в написании ваших работ!


Мы поможем в написании ваших работ!



Мы поможем в написании ваших работ!


ЗНАЕТЕ ЛИ ВЫ?

Ex. 3. Fill in the blanks with a suitable word.



Topical vocabulary

Kinds of theatres:

Drama theatre/ playhouse Open-air theatre
Musical comedy theatre Amateur theatre
Opera and ballet house Traveling company
Puppet theatre Touring company
Variety theatre/ music hall Children theatre

Shows:

Ballet Miniature
Opera Historical play/ drama
Drama Show
Comedy/ musical comedy Play
Variety show Performance
Tragedy Production
Tragicomedy/ musical tragicomedy Rehearsal/ dress rehearsal
Overture Matinee
Vaudeville First night
Farce interval

Inside the theatre:

Foyer Auditorium
Box-office Bar
Cloak-room Poster

 

Parts of the auditorium:

Stage Stalls
Scenery Orchestra pit
Curtain Box
Wings Dress-circle
Backstage Balcony
Footlights Gallery/ the gods
Top lights aisle
Dressing-room  

Theatre staff:

Cast Choreographer
Company Conductor
Actor/ actress Costume designer
Ballet dancer Make-up artist
Playwright Understudy
(Stage)director/ producer Prompter
Stage manager Attendant/ usher/ usherette
Set/ stage designer Cloakroom attendant

The audience:

Audience (public)  
Spectator  
Theatergoer  

 

At the theatre:

Opera glasses To encore
Part/ role Row
Act To book a ticket
Scene Full house
Repertoire Be all sold out
To be in the cast Script
To drop/ rise the curtain To act
To receive a curtain call Tour
To applaud Orchestra
Applause Cloak-room ticket/ check
programme To burst into applause

 

Proverbs, sayings, idioms

1. Art is long, life is short.

2. Life is a stage, so learn to play your part.

3. If you dance you must pay the fiddler.

4. Tastes differ.

5. To make one’s heart bleed.

6. To be cut to the quick.

7. To make something to heart.

8. To be on one’s last legs.

9. To read between the lines.

10. He dances well to whom fortune pipes.

11. To be dead keen on smth.

12. Business before pleasure.

13. To be at one’s best.

14. All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.


The interior of a theatre

Раздаточный материал.

1. Match the words in column A with those in column B:

А В

1. an actress а. занавес

2. a musician b. бельэтаж

3. a prompter с. номерок (гардероба)

4. a composer d. композитор

5. a stage-manager е. суфлер

6. a cloakroom f. постановщик

7. a curtain g. гардероб

8. a check h. оперный театр

9. a stage i. репетиция

10. scenery j. место (в театре)

11. an opera-house k. комедия

12. a rehearsal l. аплодировать

13. the dress-circle m. музыкант

14. a seat n. сцена

15. the comedy о. актриса

16. to applaud p. декорации

 

2. Парная работа:

Give the words to the definitions:

Student A Student B
the part of the theatre where the audience sits a raised platform in a theatre where the actors appear
the highest balcony where the cheapest seats are placed a place where hats and coats may be left
a piece of wood or metal with a number on it given in return for hat or a coat a set of actors in a play
programme the main role
a trial performance of a play a person who shows people to their seats
seats in the theatre behind the stalls a place in a theatre where tickets are sold
a sheet of heavy material to divide a stage from the part where the audience sits the first level of seats above the ground floor in a theatre
the sides of a stage where an actor is hidden from view A narrow passage between rows of seats in a theatre

3. Fill in the blanks with the corresponding words given below:

If we want to go to .... we must first look through .... to find out what.....As it is sometimes rather difficult to get .... we must book them at.....Some people don't like to have .... far from.....They try to get tickets for.....If we have little money we take seats on ... When we come to any theatre in Russia we leave our coats in .... and take .... in order to get them back when .... is over. If we want to know .... we buy.....We look through it to find out who plays.... in the performance we are going to see. After this we take our seats and wait for the lights to ..... Soon the lights go down. .... goes up and the play begins.

The curtain, a theatre, go down, the billboard, the leading role, is on, the cast, tickets, a check, a playbill, seats, the performance, the stage, book, the stalls, the gallery, go up, box-office, cloakroom.

 

4. Game “Kaboom”

Цель: Совершенствование навыков говорения по теме.

Описание: Играют в командах. Каждой команде раздается набор карточек со словами, касающимися темы «Театр» и несколько карточек со словом Kaboom. Играют по очереди, первый игрок вытаскивает карточку со словом, которое он должен объяснить, и тогда оставляет эту карточку себе. Если игрок этого сделать не может, карточка возвращается в игру. В случае если игрок вытягивает карточку со словом Kaboom, все его карточки сгорают и возвращаются в игру.

Cast Theatre Auditorium Stage Scenery
Dressing-room Stalls Gallery Actor Kaboom
Opera-house Variety theatre Box-office Tragedy Rehearsal
Comedy Poster Interval Kaboom Curtain
Ballet dancer Box Show Usher Matinee

 


Работа в командах.

Каждой команде раздается карточка на русском языке и в течение 3 минут предлагается выполнить перевод на английский язык. Затем команды по очереди зачитывают русский вариант. Команда соперников в течение 20 секунд должна перевести это предложение. За это они получают 2 балла. Если команда не справляется с заданием, то ее соперники предлагают свой вариант перевода, за что им насчитывается 1 балл. Выигрывает команда с наибольшим количеством баллов.

  1. Пьеса—это настоящее произведение искусства, и ее создание требует вдохновения, таланта и художественной изобретательности. 2. Режиссер набирает состав исполнителей и начинает репетировать сцены. 3. Интерьер современного театра состоит из сцены и зрительного зала. 4. Некоторые люди выступают перед публикой каждый день, они профессиональные артисты и их работа не всегда легка. 5. Билеты в театр заказывают заранее в театральной кассе или по телефону. 6. Роль конферансье очень важна, т.к. он объявляет номера программы, представляет актеров, удерживает внимание и интерес зрителей.  
  1. Зрительный зал отделен от сцены оркестровой ямой, а по бокам сцены находятся кулисы. 2. Генеральная репетиция наступает, когда репетиции проходят гладко и все готово к премьере. 3. Сложная система света (верхние огни и рампа) освещают сцену. 4. Художник-декоратор рисует эскизы декораций, а мастерские занимаются изготовлением декораций к определенной сцене. 5. Места на первом этаже известны как партер. 6. Когда вы приходите в театр, вы оставляете шляпу и пальто в гардеробе, и, по желанию, можете взять бинокль у гардеробщика.  

THE INTERIOR OF A THEATRE

A play lives a long life before it makes its appearance on the stage before the general public. If it is a real piece of art its creation calls for inspiration, talent and artistic ingenuity.

A playwright conceives an idea and after months and months of hard work, disappointments and joys his ideas develop into the script of the play.

Only after lengthy discussions about its merits and flaws1 does the theatre decide to stage (produce) it. The producer2 instructs the theatre staff on the general treatment of the play and outlines the main points of its stage presentation.3 The director chooses his cast4 and begins to rehearse the scenes. The scene-painter5 draws the sketches6 of the scenery7 and special work shops get busy preparing the sets,8 while the property department9 supplies the furnishings and the dress department makes the necessary costumes.

When everything is ready and the rehearsals go off with­out a hitch, a dress rehearsal10 is called. After some time the curtain rises to a full house,11the play faces the theatre-going public on its first night.12

What does the interior of a modern theatre look like? Its two main parts are the stage and the auditorium. The hall is separated from the stage by the orchestra. At the sides of the stage are the wings.13 A curtain (when lowered or drawn) covers the stage. An intricate system of lights (footlights14 and toplights) illuminates the stage. The seats on the ground floor are known as "stalls"15 (those nearer the stage are "orchestra stalls"). The passages between the rows of stalls are the gang-way. The raised back part of the ground floor is "the pit", while the small compartments nearer the stage are the "boxes." Then follow the dress circle, the balconies and, finally, the "gallery", where in some theatres, alongside with seats, standing room18 is available for the lowest admission fee.

 

VOCABULARY NOTES

1. flaw — слабая сторона, недостаток

2. producer — продюсер, режиссер-постановщик; cp. director — ре­жиссер

3. stage presentation — сценическое воплощение пьесы и т. п.; stage — сцена, эстрада, театральные подмостки; ср. scene — сцена (как часть акта драматического произведения)

е. g. Tarasova makes her appearance on the stage in the first scene of the first act.

4. cast — состав действующих лиц

5. scene-painter — художник-декоратор

6. sketch — эскиз

7. scenery (always sg.)—декорации

8. sets — декорации к определенной сцене; setting—место действия, декорации, обстановка действия

9. property department — отдел реквизита (предметов быта, используемых в театральном представлении)

10. dress rehearsal — генеральная репетиция

11. full house — полный зал

12. first night — премьера

13. wings — кулисы; behind the wings = behind the scenes — за кулисами (в прямом и переносном значении)

14. footlights—рампа; fig. театральная жизнь; профес­сия актера

15. the stalls (A.E. — orchestra) — партер orchestra stalls — первые ряды партера

the pit — амфитеатр

the boxes — ложи

the dress circle — бельэтаж

the gallery — галерка

16. standing room — место для стояния

17. ingenuity – изобретательность, искусство

18. hitch – помеха, препятствие

19. intricate – запутанный, сложный

A. the stage

B. the footlights

C. the orchestra

D. the stalls

E. the pit

F. the boxes

G. the dress circle

H. the balcony

I. the gallery

J. the curtain

 

 


GOING TO THE THEATRE

Going to the theatre is a way of spending an evening which may be at the same time most entertaining and educative.1 Despite competition from the cinema, wireless and television, the theatre still plays an important part in the entertainment of the average Englishman.

In London there are theatres for all tastes: some people prefer musical comedy, and shows of this kind, with their catchy tunes, are very popular. Variety shows, in which actors entertain the audience with sentimental and comic performances or skits on social or political life, also draw full houses and greatly influence the artistic tastes of the public. In this kind of entertainment the role of the master of ceremonies (or chairman) is very important. He announces the different items on the programme, introduces the actors and maintains the attention and interest of the spectators.

Those who do not care for musical comedy or variety will find other shows to their taste. Some theatres stage modern plays; Shakespeare and other classics are played mostly at Old Vic; the Royal Opera, formerly Covent Garden, shows opera and ballet.

Seats in theatres where dramatic works of real educational1 value are played and where the standard of acting is high are expensive. This makes the theatrical art in Britain more or less the monopoly of the well-to-do and better educated classes.

As a rule, performances start (or begin) at about half past seven and run2 for three hours or more, including about an hour for intervalsbetween acts. There are sometimes matineesin the afternoon, but most spectators prefer evening shows.

Seats are booked (or reserved) beforehand either at the box-office (or booking office) or by phone. If all the seats are not booked up (or sold out) you can get tickets at the box-office just before the show begins; otherwise, the sold-out sign3 is posted over the box-office.

The best and most expensive seats in the auditorium (or house) are the orchestra stalls, the boxes, and the dress-circle. From these seats you can get a good view of the stage. The view is not sogood from the cheaper seats — thepit and the gallery or "the gods." Spectators are not allowed to stand in the gangway (or aisle) during the performance.

When you arrive at the theatre you leave your hat and coat at the cloakroom, where the attendant can also provide you with opera-glasses if you wish. An usher shows you to your place and sells you a programme, which tells you the story of the play that is on that evening and gives the names of the actors who will act the different parts (or roles).

N О Т ES

1. educative — having value or importance in education; cf. later in the text: educational — having a direct relation to education; educational is generally used attributively, educative — predicatively; e. g. an educational film.

f.e. The experience was most educative.

2. to run — said of a single show — to last

3. the sold-out sign —a notice bearing the words "sold-out" posted over the box-office when all tickets are sold — аншлаг. But note: Спектакль шел с аншлагами. — The show was played to full houses.


EXERCISES

Ex 1. Answer the following questions:

1. What is your usual way of spending a free evening?

2. What kind of entertainment do you prefer: going to the cinema, the theatre, a concert, listening to music on the radio or watching television?

3. Do you care for opera, or do you prefer ballet? What do they show at the Bolshoi in Minsk? Where are opera and ballet shown in London?

4. Name some theatres you know and say which kind of entertainment they stage.

5. Do you like variety and do you ever watch variety shows on television?

6. Are you fond of musical comedy, or do you not care for this genre? In which Minsk theatre (or theatre in your home town) can you see musical comedy? Which musical comedies are most popular with Belarusian music-lovers?

7. Are there special theatres in Minsk staging only modern plays and others playing only classics?

8. Which is your favourite modern play? Who is it by? At which theatre did you see it?

9. Why is the theatrical art more or less the monopoly of the well-to-do classes in Britain?

10. At what time do performances begin at the Minsk theatres? For how many hours do plays run as a rule? Are there intervals after every act? At what time do shows end?

11. Which seats do you prefer at a theatre?

12. How do you book your seats (or buy your tickets) for the theatre: by going to the box-office or by phone? When is the sold-out sign posted up over the box-office? Is it easy to get tickets for the Minsk theatres just before the perform­ance begins?

13. Where do you leave your coat and hat when you enter the theatre? Who takes your coat and hat? Who provides you with opera-glasses? Who shows you to your seat? Who can you buy a programme from? What does the programme tell you?

14. Which do you prefer, matinees or evening perform­ances? (Give your reasons.)

15. In what kind of entertainment is the role of the master of ceremonies very important and why? What is the job of a master of ceremonies?

 

Ex. 2. Give the English equivalents for the following Russian words and phrases and use them in sen­tences of your own:

эстрада, эстрадный концерт, оперетта, пародия, конфе­рансье, партер, ложа, спектакль, во время спектакля, дневной спектакль, антракт, бинокль, касса, заказать билеты по телефону, развлечение, билетер, провести на место, ан­шлаг, проход, играть на сцене, игра (актера), гардероб.


 

BOOKING TICKETS

Vocabulary

- to book tickets by telephone / in person / beforehand;

- fax bookings;

- to provide one’s name, address, work and home telephone numbers;

- a call queuing system is on operation;

- to place in queue;

- to check availability;

- to refuse admission to the theatre;

- a ticket holder: to request a ticket holder to leave;

- to make some alterations in the cast;

- to be admitted to the auditorium;

- Telephone reservation must be paid within 3 working days;

- Tickets are limited to one per person;

- Standing places go on sale;

- Reduced price tickets can be bought on production of the relevant identification

 

 

Conversation 1

 

- I want 2 seats on Sunday, please.

- Matinee or evening performance?

- Evening, please.

- Well, you can have very good seats in the stalls, row 1.

- All right. How much will it do?

- 40 roubles. '

-Here you are.

Conversation 2

 

Nick: I say, Helen, have you got anything special on tomorrow night?

Helen: No, not really. Why?

Nick: I suggest going to the theatre.

Helen: I'd love to. What are we going to see?

Nick: I've got two tickets for "My Fair Lady" by Bernard Shaw. It's the first night.

Helen: I have heard the play is worth seeing. It is staged very well.

Nick: All right, then. Be seeing you at the entrance a quarter of an hour before the beginning.

Helen: Settled.


 

Conversation 3

 

Richard: Wait for me in the lobby, Pauline. We may not be able to get seats. I'll ask at the box-office window.

Richard: May I have two tickets for this evening's performance, please?

Сlerk: Do you have reservations?

Richard: No, are there any good seats left?

Сlerk: Yes, I have a few. I can give you very good seats either in the orchestra or in the first balcony, third row.

Richard: Good, I like the seats in the balcony better than those on the main floor. Give me two, please, in the aisle, if possible. Do you have programs here?

Clerk: No, you can get them from the usher at the main entrance.

Richard: We were lucky, Pauline. I've got excellent seats. I'll check my hat and coat and get the programs.

Pauline: You'd better hurry up. Look at the time. The curtain goes up at 8.30 sharp. We don't want to be late.

 

 

Ex. 1. Translate into English:

Возможно, мы не сможем достать билеты. Подожди меня в вестибюле. Ты бы лучше поторопился. Остались хорошие ме­ста? Нам повезло. Могу я купить два билета на вечерний спек­такль? У вас заказаны билеты заранее? У меня есть несколько билетов. Занавес поднимается ровно в 8.30. Я сдам в гардероб пальто и шляпу и куплю программы.

 

Ex. 2. Give a brief account of the conversations.

 

Ex. 3. Act out the conversations.

Ex. 4. Make up your own dialogue. Situation:

You are at the box-office. You want two tickets in the stalls for tonight's performance. The clerk offers you the circle.

 

 

Palace Theatre

0171434 0909

Shaftesbury Ave. London W1.

Les Miserables"Stands оut as the greatest musical of this half century"International Herald Tribune

Victor Hugo's great novel about the French revolution brought to the stage by the outstanding talent of Boublil and Schonbcrg, sweeps its audience through anepic tale of love, passion and destruction, set against the backdrop of a nation in the grip of revolutionary turmoil. Indisputably the world's most popular musical, Les Miserables has earned itself a unique place in musical history. Evenings 7.30pm, Matinees Thu and Sat at 2.30pm.

 

 

Theatre Royal Drury Lane

0171494 5000

Catherine St. WC2.

Miss Saigon"The musical is already a legend" Newsweek

Miss Saigon is the classical musical love story of our time. Set against the terror and chaos of the last days of Vietnam, Miss Saigon tells of the love between a young Vietnamese girl and an American soldier. Written by Boublil and Schonberg, its spectacular staging and powerful music have made Miss Saigon a worldwide triumph. Evenings 7.45pm, Matinees Wed and Sat at 3.00pm.

 

New London0171 405 0072

Drury Lane WC2

Cats

THE MEMORY WILL LIVE FOREVER

London and Broadway's longest-running musical has enchanted audiences ever since it first opened in 1981. An intoxicating blend of fantasy and drama combine with some of the most exciting dance ever seen on stage, and of course the wonderful music of Andrew Lloyd Webber. Evenings 7.45pm. Matinees Tues and Sat at 3.00pm.


 

Her Majesty's0171494 5400

Haymarket, London SW1.

Phantom of the Opera

"Magic, memorable and so spectacular" Sunday Express. With some of the most spectacular sets, costumes and special effects ever to have been created for the stage, this haunting musical tells the tragic story of a beautiful opera singer and a young composer, shamed by his physical appearance into living a shadowy existence beneath the majestic Paris Opera House. Evenings 7.4 5pm, Matinees Wed and Sat at 3.00pm.

 

 

1 Which two musicals are set in France?

2 Which two are based on real historical events?

3 Which one is not a love story?

4 Which one can you see on a Thursday afternoon?

5 Which one has spectacular costumes?

6 Which one has been on the longest?

7 Which one starts earliest in the evening?

8 Which one does not use a newspaper quote in its advertisement?

 

 

Discussion.

1) Imagine you're in London. Choose the show you would most like to go to. Explain why you'd like to see it.

2) Talk to other students and find someone who'd like to go to the same show on the same day.

 

In the Interval

Wick: Well, how do you find the play?

Helen: The play itself is all right, but I don't like the way it is produced.

Nick: Why? What's wrong about it?

Helen: Everything. Scenery for example. I don't like to look at the empty stage.

Nick: It's true, there was no scenery to stare at. But the costumes and make up, the light and sound effects helped to concentrate on the dialogue and acting.

Helen: Hush! Nick! The lights are going down. Let's listen to the play.

 


At the Theatre

Dick:Hallo, Pauline. You are looking prettier than ever this evening. Are you enjoying the play?

Pauline: Very much. However, the play is not as good as the book. But Helen Hais is one of our best actresses. She makes any play a success. And the stage sets are beautiful. By the way, Ed, what did you think of Eugene O'Neill's last play? Remember it ran in the National Theatre this past week.

Ed: It was his worst play. However, I don't like Eugene O'Neill as you know. He neither interests nor amuses me. He's too serious. I like at least one laugh in the play.

Pauline: Yes, I agree with you, Ed.

Richard: So do I. But there's the signal for act two. Why don't we get together after the play? We can get a bite to eat. We'll look you up later

Ex. I. Read the dialogue and answer the questions:

Where are Richard, Ed and Pauline at the moment? What are they discussing? What does Pauline think of the performance? What is her opi­nion of Helen Hais? How does she find the sets? What does Ed think of Eugene O'Neill's last play? Why doesn't he like him? What are the friends going to do after the play?

William Shakespeare

Shakespeare, William (1564-1616), was an English playwright and poet. He is generally considered the greatest dramatist the world has ever known and the finest poet who has written in the English language. Shakespeare has also been the world's most popular author. No other writer's plays have been produced so many times or read so widely in so many countries.

During his lifetime, Shakespeare was well-known to people in England, but he was looked upon only as a writer of popular plays. He wrote his plays to suit the kind of audience that would be watching them. Yet his works can be enjoyed today, as they were by the people who saw them nearly 400 years ago.

Many reasons can be given for Shakespeare's broad appeal. But his fame basically rests on his understanding of human nature. Shakespeare understood people as few other artists have. He could see in a specific dramatic situation the qualities that relate to all human beings. He could thus create characters that have meaning beyond the time and place of his plays. Yet his charac­ters are not symbolic figures. They are remarkably individual human beings. They struggle just as people do in real life, sometimes successfully and sometimes with painful and tragic failure.

Shakespeare wrote at least 37 plays, which have traditionally been divided into comedies, histories, and tragedies. These plays contain vivid characters of all types and from many walks oflife. Kings, pickpockets, drunkards, generals, hired killers, shepherds, and philosophers all mingle in Shakespeare's works.

In addition to his deep understanding of human nature, Shakespeare had knowledge in a wide variety of other subjects. These subjects include music, the law, the Bible, military science, the stage, art, politics, the sea, history, hunting, and sports. Yet as far as scholars know, Shakespeare had no professional experience in any field except the theatre.

Shakespeare was born to what today would be called middle-class parents. His birthplace was the small market town of Stratford-upon-Avon. Shortly after he married at the age of 18, Shakespeare apparently left Stratford to seek his fortune in the theatrical world of London. Within a few years, he had become one of city's leading actors and playwrights. By 1612, when he seems to have partially retired to Stratford, Shakespeare had become England's most popular playwright.

Shakespeare has had enormous influence on culture throughout the world. His works helped shape the literature of all English-speaking countries and of such countries as Germany and Russia. Shakespeare also contributed greatly to the development of the English language. He freely experimented with grammar and vocabulary and so helped prevent literary English from becoming fixed and artificial. Besides, many words and phrases from Shakespeare's plays and poems have become part of English everyday speech. They are used by millions of people who are unaware that Shakespeare created them. For example, Shakespeare originated such familiar phrases as fair play, a foregone conclusion, catch cold, and disgraceful conduct. As far as scholars can tell, Shakespeare also invented such common words as assassination, bump, eventful and lonely.

Many people can identify lines and passages as Shakespeare's even though they have never seen or read one of his plays. Examples include "To be, or not to be", "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears", and "A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse!"

Besides influencing language and literature, Shakespeare has affected other aspects of culture in the English-speaking world. His plays and poems have long been a required part of a liberal education. As a result, Shakespeare's ideas on such subjects as heroism, romantic love, and the nature of tragedy have helped shape the attitudes of millions of people.

 


 

 

Барбикан.

С открытием в 1984 году одного из самых крупных центров в Европе Барбикана культурная жизнь британской столицы стала богаче и разнообразней. Лондонское Сити финансировало строительство удивительного комплекса 25 лет. Барбикан включает 2 театральных зала Королевской Шекспировской труппы и концертный зал на 2000 мест, отданный Лондонскому симфоническому оркестру. Кроме того, в Барбикане есть картинная галерея, площадка для выставок скульптуры, Школа музыки и драмы, публичная библиотека, 3 кинотеатра, 5 конференц-залов, 2 зала для торговых выставок, 2 ресторана и множество баров. Из фойе, которое простирается на пять этажей вниз, можно легко попасть в театральные и концертные залы, а также на открытую террасу с видом на искусственное озеро. В главном зале театра ярусы тянутся к потолку и окружают сцену, но ни одно из мест не удалено от сцены более чем на 19 метров. Под главным зрительным залом расположен театр "Пит", предназначенный для студийных постановок. Еще ниже - самый большой из трех кинотеатров (280 мест). Основа деятельности Барбикана - согласованность всех культурных программ, каждый вид искусства освещает главную тему по-своему. Барбикан, безусловно, пользуется успехом благодаря впечатляющему диапазону мероприятий.

 

Ex. IV. Discussion:

1. Which of the London theatres would you go to if you had a chance? Explain your choice.

2. Compare the theatreland in Belarus (Minsk, Grodno, Vitebsk) with that of London. Share your opinions with those of your groupmates.


Shakespeare's Globe

 

The Globe Theatre was an octagonal structure with an unroofed yard in the centre where the ‘groundlings’ stood.

Groundlingswere those people of the audience who paid a mere penny to attend. The groundlings were closer to the stage than were people of the gallery audience, but they had a less satisfactory view.

Three tiers of seats, the galleries, rose around the perimeter of the yard and were protected by a thatched roof. Theatre-goers in the galleries looked down on a wooden stage, raised a few feet off the ground.

At the back of the main stage were two doors that led to a dressing room and were used for most of the actor’s entrances and exits. Built into the main stage were one or more trapdoors leading to an area below the stage. Actors playing ghosts or witches would appear and disappear through the trapdoors. Above the stage was a small building known as ‘the heavens’ where the stage crew could produce thunder and other sound effects.

Although the Globe was not a large theatre, it could accommodate more than two thousand spectators, about eight hundred of whom stood in the yard. Performances were given in the afternoon, the stage being lit by daylight. Costumes were colourful and often expensive, hut the sets were simple, and scenery was hardly used at all. The companies strove for special effects, however such as birds and goddesses descending from the roof by means of ropes and pulleys.

Women’s roles in the plays were acted by men or, more commonly by boys. Partly because of the absence of scenery to change and the absence of a curtain across the main stage, the plays proceeded at a brisk pace. Actors spoke their lines more rapidly than they do today. A good voice and excellent diction were imperative, and Elizabethan audiences spoke of ‘hearing’ plays rather than ‘seeing’ them. The plays had to have dramatic power to hold a popular and sometimes unruly audience. Shakespeare’s plays certainly had that power as they still do today.

The original Globe was built in 1599 on the south bank of the Thames, and rebuilt 14 years later following a fire in 1613 and remained in use until1644 when it was demolished to make space for new houses. Shakespeare died in 1616, but the theatre continued to perform his work until the Puritans closed it in 1642.

 

This meticulous reproduction of Shakespeare's original Globe Theatre - constructed using Elizabethan building techniques - offers authentic performances and guided tours.

In 1986 permission was given to the American actor and director, Sam Wanamaker, to build an exact copy of Shakespeare’s Globe theatre on The late Sam Wanamaker did not live to see the fulfilment of his 40-year dream of re-creating the 'Wooden O-shaped' thatched theatre, where many of the greatest plays in the English language were first performed. However, shortly before the legendary American director died in 1993, he saw the shell of the new Globe erected.

Standing a short distance from the site of the original, the new theatre specializes in plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries. The enormous cost of the new Globe - £30m at the last count - was the result of painstaking efforts to re-create the original, right down to the lime and goats hair used for plaster. The story of the construction is told in a special exhibition.

The design of the theatre, three sheltered tiers in a circle around the open-air stage, means no-one is more than half the length of a tennis court from the stage. Seats in the three galleries, which accommodate 1,000 people, cost £5-20. An extra 500 'groundlings' (who stand in the yard around the stage) pay a flat rate of £5.

The picturesque riverside location is relatively quiet - only the occasional passing helicopter drowns out the actors' lines. The wooden benches can get uncomfortable during a three-hour Shakespeare play, but cushions are available. The first public performance at the new Globe in 1996 had to be halted after an actor, swinging down to the stage by a rope, broke his leg.

Attached to the Globe theatre is a smaller, indoor theatre, built according to a design by Inigo Jones.

Ex.I. Answer the questions:

1. What does the reproduction of Shakespeare’s original Globe Theatre offer?

2. Where were many of the great plays first performed?

3. When was the original Globe built and then rebuilt?

4. What does the new theatre specialize in?

5. What was the cost of the New Globe?

6. What is told in a special exhibition?

7. What is the distance from the stage for the spectators?

8. How many seats do the three galleries accommodate?

9. What is the location like?

10. What are the seats made of?

11. What happened during the first public performance at the new Globe in 1996?

 

Ex. II. Complete the sentences:

1. The meticulous reproduction of Shakespeare’s original Globe Theatre offers…

2. Many of the greatest plays in the English language were first performed…

3. The original Globe was built in …

4. After Shakespeare’s death the theatre continued …

5. The result of the effort to recreate the original Globe theatre was …

6. The story of the construction is told …

7. The theatre accommodates …

8. The picturesque riverside location is …

9. The wooden benches can get …

10. The first public performance at the new Globe was in …

 

Ex. III. Speak on the following:

1. Describe the interior of the Globe.

2. Compare a modern theatre and the original Globe.

3. Compare the staff now and then.

 

Theatre in London

Most British cities have a theatre, but London has the greatest number. There are over 50 theatres in London's West End, the area in London with most theatres, and about 35 smaller fringe theatres.

In recent years, musicals have been very successful. About 5 million people, many of them tourists, go to see a musical every year in London.

Going to the theatre in Britain is not only popular, but also expensive. Not many young people can afford to go. It is possible to get cheaper tickets by going to afternoon performances called matinees or by buying stand-bys, half-price tick­ets which are sold half an hour before a performance starts.

Britain has a long tradition of drama. British theatre began in the thirteenth century, before the time of Shakespeare, with a series of short stories from the Bible called The Mystery Plays. Even today, every four years in York and Chester, ordinary people still perform these plays.

Acting, both by amateurs and professionals, is still very much alive in Brit­ain. British professional actors are usually highly respected and well-trained.

The most famous British theatres are the National Theatre and the Barbican. The Royal Shakespeare Company performs at the Barbican in London and in Stratford-on-Avon, where Shakespeare was born. These theatres receive money from the government so that they can perform several different plays a year. In spite ofthis money from the government, many theatres, including the National Theatre and the Barbican, find it difficult to survive.

There are many smaller theatre groups in Britain. Some of them receive money from the government to perform plays which are contemporary and ex­perimental.

From "In Britain" by M. Vaughan-Rees


 

Topical vocabulary

Kinds of theatres:

Drama theatre/ playhouse Open-air theatre
Musical comedy theatre Amateur theatre
Opera and ballet house Traveling company
Puppet theatre Touring company
Variety theatre/ music hall Children theatre

Shows:

Ballet Miniature
Opera Historical play/ drama
Drama Show
Comedy/ musical comedy Play
Variety show Performance
Tragedy Production
Tragicomedy/ musical tragicomedy Rehearsal/ dress rehearsal
Overture Matinee
Vaudeville First night
Farce interval

Inside the theatre:

Foyer Auditorium
Box-office Bar
Cloak-room Poster

 

Parts of the auditorium:

Stage Stalls
Scenery Orchestra pit
Curtain Box
Wings Dress-circle
Backstage Balcony
Footlights Gallery/ the gods
Top lights aisle
Dressing-room  

Theatre staff:

Cast Choreographer
Company Conductor
Actor/ actress Costume designer
Ballet dancer Make-up artist
Playwright Understudy
(Stage)director/ producer Prompter
Stage manager Attendant/ usher/ usherette
Set/ stage designer Cloakroom attendant

The audience:

Audience (public)  
Spectator  
Theatergoer  

 

At the theatre:

Opera glasses To encore
Part/ role Row
Act To book a ticket
Scene Full house
Repertoire Be all sold out
To be in the cast Script
To drop/ rise the curtain To act
To receive a curtain call Tour
To applaud Orchestra
Applause Cloak-room ticket/ check
programme To burst into applause

 

Proverbs, sayings, idioms

1. Art is long, life is short.

2. Life is a stage, so learn to play your part.

3. If you dance you must pay the fiddler.

4. Tastes differ.

5. To make one’s heart bleed.

6. To be cut to the quick.

7. To make something to heart.

8. To be on one’s last legs.

9. To read between the lines.

10. He dances well to whom fortune pipes.

11. To be dead keen on smth.

12. Business before pleasure.

13. To be at one’s best.

14. All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.


The interior of a theatre

Раздаточный материал.

1. Match the words in column A with those in column B:

А В

1. an actress а. занавес

2. a musician b. бельэтаж

3. a prompter с. номерок (гардероба)

4. a composer d. композитор

5. a stage-manager е. суфлер

6. a cloakroom f. постановщик

7. a curtain g. гардероб

8. a check h. оперный театр

9. a stage i. репетиция

10. scenery j. место (в театре)

11. an opera-house k. комедия

12. a rehearsal l. аплодировать

13. the dress-circle m. музыкант

14. a seat n. сцена

15. the comedy о. актриса

16. to applaud p. декорации

 

2. Парная работа:

Give the words to the definitions:

Student A Student B
the part of the theatre where the audience sits a raised platform in a theatre where the actors appear
the highest balcony where the cheapest seats are placed a place where hats and coats may be left
a piece of wood or metal with a number on it given in return for hat or a coat a set of actors in a play
programme the main role
a trial performance of a play a person who shows people to their seats
seats in the theatre behind the stalls a place in a theatre where tickets are sold
a sheet of heavy material to divide a stage from the part where the audience sits the first level of seats above the ground floor in a theatre
the sides of a stage where an actor is hidden from view A narrow passage between rows of seats in a theatre

3. Fill in the blanks with the corresponding words given below:

If we want to go to .... we must first look through .... to find out what.....As it is sometimes rather difficult to get .... we must book them at.....Some people don't like to have .... far from.....They try to get tickets for.....If we have little money we take seats on ... When we come to any theatre in Russia we leave our coats in .... and take .... in order to get them back when .... is over. If we want to know .... we buy.....We look through it to find out who plays.... in the performance we are going to see. After this we take our seats and wait for the lights to ..... Soon the lights go down. .... goes up and the play begins.

The curtain, a theatre, go down, the billboard, the leading role, is on, the cast, tickets, a check, a playbill, seats, the performance, the stage, book, the stalls, the gallery, go up, box-office, cloakroom.

 

4. Game “Kaboom”

Цель: Совершенствование навыков говорения по теме.

Описание: Играют в командах. Каждой команде раздается набор карточек со словами, касающимися темы «Театр» и несколько карточек со словом Kaboom. Играют по очереди, первый игрок вытаскивает карточку со словом, которое он должен объяснить, и тогда оставляет эту карточку себе. Если игрок этого сделать не может, карточка возвращается в игру. В случае если игрок вытягивает карточку со словом Kaboom, все его карточки сгорают и возвращаются в игру.

Cast Theatre Auditorium Stage Scenery
Dressing-room Stalls Gallery Actor Kaboom
Opera-house Variety theatre Box-office Tragedy Rehearsal
Comedy Poster Interval Kaboom Curtain
Ballet dancer Box Show Usher Matinee

 


Работа в командах.

Каждой команде раздается карточка на русском языке и в течение 3 минут предлагается выполнить перевод на английский язык. Затем команды по очереди зачитывают русский вариант. Команда соперников в течение 20 секунд должна перевести это предложение. За это они получают 2 балла. Если команда не справляется с заданием, то ее соперники предлагают свой вариант перевода, за что им насчитывается 1 балл. Выигрывает команда с наибольшим количеством баллов.

  1. Пьеса—это настоящее произведение искусства, и ее создание требует вдохновения, таланта и художественной изобретательности. 2. Режиссер набирает состав исполнителей и начинает репетировать сцены. 3. Интерьер современного театра состоит из сцены и зрительного зала. 4. Некоторые люди выступают перед публикой каждый день, они профессиональные артисты и их работа не всегда легка. 5. Билеты в театр заказывают заранее в театральной кассе или по телефону. 6. Роль конферансье очень важна, т.к. он объявляет номера программы, представляет актеров, удерживает внимание и интерес зрителей.  
  1. Зрительный зал отделен от сцены оркестровой ямой, а по бокам сцены находятся кулисы. 2. Генеральная репетиция наступает, когда репетиции проходят гладко и все готово к премьере. 3. Сложная система света (верхние огни и рампа) освещают сцену. 4. Художник-декоратор рисует эскизы декораций, а мастерские занимаются изготовлением декораций к определенной сцене. 5. Места на первом этаже известны как партер. 6. Когда вы приходите в театр, вы оставляете шляпу и пальто в гардеробе, и, по желанию, можете взять бинокль у гардеробщика.  

THE INTERIOR OF A THEATRE

A play lives a long life before it makes its appearance on the stage before the general public. If it is a real piece of art its creation calls for inspiration, talent and artistic ingenuity.

A playwright conceives an idea and after months and months of hard work, disappointments and joys his ideas develop into the script of the play.

Only after lengthy discussions about its merits and flaws1 does the theatre decide to stage (produce) it. The producer2 instructs the theatre staff on the general treatment of the play and outlines the main points of its stage presentation.3 The director chooses his cast4 and begins to rehearse the scenes. The scene-painter5 draws the sketches6 of the scenery7 and special work shops get busy preparing the sets,8 while the property department9 supplies the furnishings and the dress department makes the necessary costumes.

When everything is ready and the rehearsals go off with­out a hitch, a dress rehearsal10 is called. After some time the curtain rises to a full house,11the play faces the theatre-going public on its first night.12

What does the interior of a modern theatre look like? Its two main parts are the stage and the auditorium. The hall is separated from the stage by the orchestra. At the sides of the stage are the wings.13 A curtain (when lowered or drawn) covers the stage. An intricate system of lights (footlights14 and toplights) illuminates the stage. The seats on the ground floor are known as "stalls"15 (those nearer the stage are "orchestra stalls"). The passages between the rows of stalls are the gang-way. The raised back part of the ground floor is "the pit", while the small compartments nearer the stage are the "boxes." Then follow the dress circle, the balconies and, finally, the "gallery", where in some theatres, alongside with seats, standing room18 is available for the lowest admission fee.

 

VOCABULARY NOTES

1. flaw — слабая сторона, недостаток

2. producer — продюсер, режиссер-постановщик; cp. director — ре­жиссер

3. stage presentation — сценическое воплощение пьесы и т. п.; stage — сцена, эстрада, театральные подмостки; ср. scene — сцена (как часть акта драматического произведения)

е. g. Tarasova makes her appearance on the stage in the first scene of the first act.

4. cast — состав действующих лиц

5. scene-painter — художник-декоратор

6. sketch — эскиз

7. scenery (always sg.)—декорации

8. sets — декорации к определенной сцене; setting—место действия, декорации, обстановка действия

9. property department — отдел реквизита (предметов быта, используемых в театральном представлении)

10. dress rehearsal — генеральная репетиция

11. full house — полный зал

12. first night — премьера

13. wings — кулисы; behind the wings = behind the scenes — за кулисами (в прямом и переносном значении)

14. footlights—рампа; fig. театральная жизнь; профес­сия актера

15. the stalls (A.E. — orchestra) — партер orchestra stalls — первые ряды партера

the pit — амфитеатр

the boxes — ложи

the dress circle — бельэтаж

the gallery — галерка

16. standing room — место для стояния

17. ingenuity – изобретательность, искусство

18. hitch – помеха, препятствие

19. intricate – запутанный, сложный

A. the stage

B. the footlights

C. the orchestra

D. the stalls

E. the pit

F. the boxes

G. the dress circle

H. the balcony

I. the gallery

J. the curtain

 

 


GOING TO THE THEATRE

Going to the theatre is a way of spending an evening which may be at the same time most entertaining and educative.1 Despite competition from the cinema, wireless and television, the theatre still plays an important part in the entertainment of the average Englishman.

In London there are theatres for all tastes: some people prefer musical comedy, and shows of this kind, with their catchy tunes, are very popular. Variety shows, in which actors entertain the audience with sentimental and comic performances or skits on social or political life, also draw full houses and greatly influence the artistic tastes of the public. In this kind of entertainment the role of the master of ceremonies (or chairman) is very important. He announces the different items on the programme, introduces the actors and maintains the attention and interest of the spectators.

Those who do not care for musical comedy or variety will find other shows to their taste. Some theatres stage modern plays; Shakespeare and other classics are played mostly at Old Vic; the Royal Opera, formerly Covent Garden, shows opera and ballet.



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