ТОП 10:

К самому занятию - Выучить темы NEWS Values,



Факультет Журналистики (заочное отделение)

Курс

Преподаватель Колмакова В.С .,

Кафедра Иностранных Языков

Института Лингвистики

и международной коммуникации

Установка

1. Перевести все тексты письменно, выполнить все задания к текстам письменно (стр 2-9). Будьте внимательны: в креативном задании типа case study, project work у каждого студента должен быть свой текст!!!

2. Просмотреть грамматические фокусы, выполнить письменно задания в разделах “Grammar Activity” (стр 10-11)

3. Все то, что сделаете в п.1 и п.2 выслать на почтуveducation@mail.ru до начала следующей сессии.

К самому занятию - Выучить темы NEWS Values,

Types of news, THe inverted pyramid.

НАйти новость, перевести на русский язык и проанализировать по плану.

1.Тип новости (как написана, цель, целевая аудитория)

2.Какие новостные факторы присутствуют

3.действует ли правило перевернутой пирамиды и почему, доказать

 

Unit 1. TYPES OF MEDIA

Lead-in:

Answer the following questions, compare your opinions in a group discussion.

Ø What are the different media of mass communication?

Ø What do we understand by mass communication?

Ø What is the difference between print and electronic media?

Ø What is the difference between face-to-face and mass communication?

I. Scan the text below and find the definitions for the following terms:

Mass media, print media, electronic media, news media

THE MEDIA

The media include print media such as newspapers and magazines, and electronic media such as radio and television.

The word media is most often used to refer to the communication of news, and in this context means the same as news media.

Media and mass media are often used when discussing the power of modern communications.

The press usually refers just to newspapers, but the term can be extended to include magazines.

THE PRESS

Newspapers are either tabloid, a format usually associated in the English speaking world with popular press or broadsheet, associated with quality journalism. Tabloids are sometimes referred to as a gutter press by people who disapprove of them. Tabloids often have very large circulations (number sold) and even bigger readerships (total number of people reading them). Papers such as these are often referred to as mass circulation papers.

Printed periodicals, newspapers, and other publications appear at regular intervals, for example, a daily comes out every day, a fortnightly – once in two weeks (once a fortnight).

National newspapers circulate all over the country. They cover national or home news as well as news from abroad or international news. Local newspapers (or regional papers) serve community interests. In the local press the terms “popular” or “quality” have no real significance, the papers tend to be politically neutral. They contain articles which feature the life of the local community as well as details of local theater and cinema performances. Such newspapers carry a lot of advertisement.

Sunday papers. Popular Sunday papers published in Britain on Sundays are national ones. Quality Sunday papers devote large sections to literature and the arts, business and sport, and have long feature articles which explore specific subjects in depth. They come with color supplements or magazines. There are a growing number of free sheets – papers delivered free to every house in the area. Some of these have an editorial content, but many consist largely of the advertising which finances them.

ELECTRONIC MEDIA

Programmes on radio and television may be referred to formally as broadcasts; and they may be referred to informally as shows, specially in American English.

Programmes or shows on radio and television are often presented or hosted by a programme host. Popular music Programmes are presented by disc jockeys or DJs.

News programmes may be hosted, fronted, or anchored by anchors famous in their own right, sometimes more famous than the people in the news. Variations of the noun anchor are shown above.

In more traditional news programmes, the news is read by a newsreader or newscaster: newscaster is now a rather old-fashioned word.

Reporters and correspondents, or television journalists, make reports. They and the camera operators who go with them are news gatherers. Together they form TV crews.

Broadcasters are TV and radio organizations, the people working for them, or, more specifically, the professional media people who actually participate in programmes (М.С. Лебедева, Г.М. Фролова Язык средств массовой информации Великобритании и США. – МГЛУ, 2009).

THE SCELETON OF A NEWSPAPER

Long before any of the words are written the editor knows what tomorrow’s newspaper is going to look like - from a dummy.

Dummies are blank pages, exactly the same size as the real paper, with spaces, which have been booked for advertisements crossed out. The crosses are accurately measured to indicate the exact space the advertisements will occupy in the finished paper.

Every newspaper has its own shape, size and general layout. This is known as its format.

A format makes life easier for both journalists and readers. If really important news comes in, such as a general strike, everyone knows it goes on the front page. The results of a football match belong unquestionably on the sports pages, and an interview with a pop singer will never be mixed up with share prices. Likewise, the television and radio programmes won’t jump from page to page each day. They will always be in the same place where regular readers can find them.

The format will vary from paper to paper. Some newspapers set out with the main intention of entertaining their readers. They will have lots of photographs, illustrations and cartoons and large eye-catching headlines. These are known as “popular” papers and often use the rather smaller “tabloid” format.

Other newspapers are aimed at the more serious or committed readers: those who like their news in-depth want to know how well the dollar and the pound and the deutschmark are doing and what the latest trading figures are. The newspapers that cater for them are known as “heavy” or “quality” papers. They usually give much greater emphasis to foreign news and the arts and have fewer photographs.

At 11.00 a.m. the editor calls his morning conference. Departmental editors with clipboards and pens file into his office and sit themselves down.

The news editor begins. He has six possible lead stories for tomorrow’s paper: a mining accident, a mountaineering death in the Himalayas, a restaurant blown up by terrorists, an Asian writer who had died in police detention, the kidnap of a foreign industrialist's child, and a fire at a local power station.

The diary editor has five ideas to work on, including a rumour about a film star marrying for the third time, which he heard at a dinner party last night.

The features editor explains how she was planning to use an interview with a ventriloquist, but another paper ran a similar article this morning.

“Then spike it”, the editor declares. “What else have you got? What about something to tie in with the Himalayan story?”

“Yes”, says the features editor. “One of our freelances is a very keen climber. I'll see if I can get him to write something”.

The sports editor announces he is expecting results from the Test Match, a report from the tennis championship, and a profile on the golfer tipped to win the British Open.

The picture editor reports that some good shots of the restaurant blast have come, and two photographers are covering the fire at the power station.

When they all meet again in the editor’s office at 5.00 p.m. for the afternoon conference, they look at the stories once more.

Further details have come in about the mining accident. There are now known to be 35 people trapped underground and rescue operations are under way.

The story of the death of the Asian politician is unchanged. The details seem confused, but the police now claim that the man tried to escape from prison.

The fire still rages at the power station - but all the early evening papers have led with the restaurant blast.

The meeting breaks up.

At 7.00 p.m. a politician speaks out and accuses the Asian police of murder. This makes the story far more important. On the other hand, the fire provides good local interest.

At 8.30 part of the burning building collapses, killing two firemen, That decides it. The main lead for tomorrow's paper is the firemen. The second story covers the politician, and the mining accident is spread across four columns at the bottom of the page.

So another edition goes to press (Телень Э.Ф. Газета в современном мире. Пособие по английскому языку. М.: Вш.шк., 2007).

II. Answer the questions using the text:

  • What is a dummy?
  • Why does a format make life easier for both journalists and readers?
  • What is a “popular” paper? What would you expect to find in a “popular” paper?
  • What’s a “quality” paper? What kind of readers do “quality” papers cater for?
  • What “popular” and “quality” newspapers in Britain do you know?
  • Describe the editor’s morning conference.
  • What normally decides the main lead for the paper?

CASE-STUDY

You are working on a yellow press newspaper. Your editor gives you the task to write an article about a celebrity (you should choose yourself). Moreover you should make up intriguing photos.

Present your article and photos in class.

 

 

TV and Radio Programmes

Programmes on radio and television may be referred to formally as broadcasts; and they may be referred to informally as shows, especially in American English.

Programmes or shows on radio and television are often presented or hosted by a programme host. Popular music programmes are presented by disc jockeys or DJs.

News programmes may be hosted, fronted, or anchored by anchors famous in their own right, sometimes more famous than the people in the news.

In more traditional news programmes, the news is read by a newsreader or newscaster (newscaster is now a rather old-fashioned word).

Reporters and correspondents, or television journalists, make reports. They and the camera operators who go with them are news gatherers. Together they form TV crews.

Broadcasters are TV and radio organizations, the people working for them, or, more specifically, the professional media people who actually participate in programmes.

Programmes and reports are transmitted or broadcast live in a live broadcast, with events seen or heard as they happen, or recorded for broadcast later. A recording of an event can be referred to as footage of that event.

A news programme might include:

dramatic footage of events such as war or disasters

interviews and studio discussions: pictures of people participating in these are often referred to as talking heads (an informal expression used to show disapproval of what can be a boring form of television)

vox-pop interviews, or vox-pops getting the reactions of ordinary people, often in the street

clips, or extracts, of any of these things.

People sometimes say that today’s news programmes are infotainment, a mixture of information, and entertainment, something that people watch or listen to for pleasure. Another example of infotainment is docudrama where real events are dramatised and reenacted by actors. This is a combination of documentary and drama: a documentary is a serious factual radio or TV programme.

There is, of course, a lot of competition between broadcasting organizations. Most TV and radio networks want to increase the size of their audience, or their ratings, at the expense of other networks.

Good ratings are especially important during prime time or peak-time, the time of day, or slot, when most people watch TV. Slot also means any short period in broadcasting reserved for a specific purpose.

High audience figures attract more advertising or commercials to be shown in commercial breaks between programmes. Commercials are also known as spots.

The media often talk about rating battles or ratings wars between networks when discussing competition in the industry (И.В. Миголатьева Международная журналистика. – РУДН, 2008).

Unit 4. ADVERTISING

Lead-in:

 

GRAMMAR FOCUS

II. Grammar Activity

  1. Fill in the correct relative pronoun. If it can be omitted, put it in brackets.
  1. National newspapers contain articles … feature the life of the local community as well as details of local theater and cinema performances.
  2. Dummies are blank pages, exactly the same size as the real paper, with spaces, … have been booked for advertisements crossed out.
  3. Other newspapers are aimed at the more serious or committed readers: those … like their news in-depth want to know how well the dollar and the pound and the euro are doing and what the latest trading figures are.
  4. A type of personal blog is referred to as “microblogging”, … is extremely detailed blogging as it seeks to capture a moment in time.
  1. Give definition to the following types of newspapers using identifying relative clauses:
  • sunday papers
  • quality press
  • popular press
  • tabloid press
  • gutter press
  • broadsheet
  • daily
  • weekly
  • fortnightly
  • monthly
  • annual

GLOSSARY

mass media print media electronic media news media regional papers free sheets national newspapers sunday papers quality press popular press tabloid press gutter press broadsheet readership journalist editor columnist leading article (leader) celebrity (celeb) glitterati paparazzo (paparazzi) daily weekly fortnightly monthly annual broadcast show disc jockey/ DJ anchor news reader, news caster reporter/ correspondent report news gatherer TV crew broadcaster footage talking heads vox-pop(uli) interview clip infotainment docudrama documentary prime time/ peak-time slot commercial breaks rating battles/wars dummy blank pages shape format share prices committed reader rumours freelance blog personal blogs corporate and organizational blogs blogs by genre blogs by media type blogs by device post blogger blogroll audioblog mommy blog photoblog milblog to go on the front page to front, anchor a programme to host, host /present, presenter

 

Факультет Журналистики (заочное отделение)

Курс

Преподаватель Колмакова В.С .,

Кафедра Иностранных Языков

Института Лингвистики

и международной коммуникации

Установка

1. Перевести все тексты письменно, выполнить все задания к текстам письменно (стр 2-9). Будьте внимательны: в креативном задании типа case study, project work у каждого студента должен быть свой текст!!!

2. Просмотреть грамматические фокусы, выполнить письменно задания в разделах “Grammar Activity” (стр 10-11)

3. Все то, что сделаете в п.1 и п.2 выслать на почтуveducation@mail.ru до начала следующей сессии.

К самому занятию - Выучить темы NEWS Values,







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